Awards to the Royal Canadian Navy 
1950 to 1968 (Excluding KOREA)
BEEMAN, John Henault ("Jack"), Lieutenant-Commander (P), CD (0­5390) - George Medal (GM)
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 7 February 1959.
  Also honoured were LCdr (P) F.R. Fink (George Medal),
   Petty Officer L.W. Vipond (Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct)
   and Leading Seaman P.A. Smith (Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct).
   See also Kealey and Russell, A History of Canadian Naval Aviation, 1918-1962, page 60.
Born at Fort Williams, Ontario on 13 August 1923.
Sub-Lieutenant RCNVR on 9 September 1942 at Avalon.
Lieutenant (Temporary) RCNVR on 9 September 1943.
To RCN 1945 and promoted Lieutenant (P) RCN on 9 February 1945.
To RNAS Rattray for No. 753 RN Squadron 1946.
To Shearwater for VH-21 Squadron as Commanding Officer from August 1953 to April 1955.
To HU-21 as Commanding Officer from April 1955 to January 1956.
To Niagara for Canadian Joint Defence Liaison Staff as Helicopter Liaison Staff Officer in 1956.
He married Peggy Stewart and they had seven children: Heather (Bob) McMullen, Debby (Marvin Tate, Lorie (Tom Benham), John Beeman (Tracy), Cindy (Ted Langtry), Jeffrey Beeman (Joanne) and Tracy (Chuck Montgomery).
He was a member of the Corps of Commissionaires at the Canadian War Museum until 1996, when the museum dispensed with the services of that Corps.
He died in Ottawa on 21 December 2010 at the age of 88.
From page 60, 'A History of Canadian Naval Aviation 1918­1962: "Out of control the Liberian freighter 'Kismet II' drifted on to the jagged rocks at the base of 1,000­foot cliffs of Cape Lawrence on Cape Breton Island. A Sikorsky piloted by LCdr J.H. Beeman and LCdr F.R. Fink dipped low over the stricken ship in attempts to rescue the crew but was unable to do so owing to the strong winds and rough sea, which also prevented the launching of small boats to go alongside. During the anxious night, a truck loaded with rescue equipment, life­lines and breeches buoys arrived at the top of the cliff after an arduous trip behind a snow­plough. Conditions had improved slightly on the morrow but it was still an extremely hazardous manoeuvre to approach the 'Kismet'. Signs were made to the men to clear a landing space aft; when obstructions such as the after binnacle guard­ rails and so on, had been removed, the helicopter slipped in sideways and balanced with power on, while the first load of passengers scrambled aboard. Four trips were necessary to bring off the 21­man crew, the Captain's dog and the ship's cat.' The full citation amplifies this extract: "On November 26, 1955 Lieutenant Commander J.H. BEEMAN, pilot; Lieutenant Commander F.R. FINK, co­pilot; and two seamen were jointly responsible for saving the 21 members of the crew of the Liberian Freighter S.S. 'KISMET II', which had run aground on the rocky coast of Cape Breton Island against a cliff which rose almost vertically from the sea to a height of some 400 feet and was being pounded to pieces by heavy seas. It was decided by the authorities concerned that the rescue could not be effected from shore while heavy seas and reefs made any attempts from sea impossible. At 0815 hours on November 26, 1955 LCdr Beeman and LCdr Fink, and the two seamen who had volunteered to be crew members, flew his helicopter towards the wreck. The wind had veered slightly and he found that along the cliff face, the turbulence was not so great and he was able to approach close to the 'KISMET II' and still maintain control of his helicopter. His co­pilot and crew, by hand signals, were able to make the crew of the ship understand that they wanted the after steering platform cleared away by the removal of ventilators, rails, etc., so that the helicopter could land. This operation was accomplished in short order and LCdr Beeman succeeded in balancing his helicopter on the deck on three wheels; the fact that fairly heavy turbulence was still being encountered and that the cliff was only about 25 feet away, made any attempt at a rescue by hoist, with the helicopter hovering, impractical. He embarked four members of the ship's crew, and by watching his opportunity between gusts, was able to take off from his precarious position and land them ashore. Leaving his co­pilot and one seaman behind, LCdr Beeman made a second trip to the 'KISMET II', this time removing 7 of the crew. LCdr Beeman was considerably fatigued by this time, and the third and fourth trips in which the remaining 10 members of the ship's crew were removed, were made by the co­pilot LCdr Fink."
Medals of Lieutenant-Commander John Henault BEEMAN, GM, CD, RCN



George Medal (EIIR) ­ 39/45 Star ­ Atlantic Star
 ­ CVSM and Clasp - 39/45 WM ­ CD (EIIR)
 
	* * * * *

BLANCHARD, Phillippe Arsene Joseph, Lieutenant, CD (0-7126)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 17 September 1966.
Naval Cadet (Short Service Appointment) 2 August 1954.
To Venture for Officer Training.
Midshipman (SSA) RCN on 1 September 1956.
To RCAF Station Penhold in 1956.
Promoted Sub-Lieutenant on 1 March 1958 and posted to Shearwater
 as Pilot in HS-50 Squadron.
Lieutenant (SSA) RCN 1 May 1960.
To HU-21 Squadron for Operations Department in 1965.
	
	"While at sea on the night of 18 October 1965, advice was received by HMCS Bonaventure
 that HMCS Nipigon was on fire and urgently required medical assistance, fire­fighting
 equipment, and wished to evacuate eight seriously burned member of her crew.  Lt Blanchard
 was pilot of helicopter 'Pedro'; Lt McDermott was co­pilot and; LS Bowen was employed as
 aircrewman on the helicopter.  They made three flights between the two ships delivering
 fire­fighting equipment and medical supplies, returning with the eight injured crew
 members.  These flights were made despite the hazardous conditions that existed at
 the time, a dark night with visibility reduced in rain, and flying a helicopter that
 was not designed for low flying over water at night under instrument conditions.  The
 skill of Lt Blanchard and Lt McDermott, coupled with their devotion to duty and complete
 disregard for their own personal safety, allowed eight men to receive urgently required
 medical treatment only available on HMCS Bonaventure.


	* * * * *

BOUCHARD, Jacques Pierre G., Able Seaman (35921-H) - George Medal - RCN
- Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 26 March 1960 and London Gazette of 29 March 1960.
  Also awarded the same honour were Lieutenant J.W. McDermott
 and Leading Seaman K.F. Bowen.

	"On the afternoon of the 20th August, 1959, a CS2F Tracker (1519) aircraft of
 Anti­Submarine Squadron 880 crashed on take­off while carrying out Field Carrier
 Landing Practice at the Naval Air Station Shearwater, Nova Scotia.  The aircraft
 stalled at about 150 feet from the ground and went into an uncontrolled slow roll
 before landing, right side up, in a revetment adjacent to the tower at Shearwater.

	The co­pilot Lt (P) Roger D. Nantel, RCN, managed to escape from the plane but
 the pilot, Lt (P) G.A. Caldwell, RCN, who was unconscious, remained in the aircraft
 which was on fire.  AS Jacques P.G. Bouchard, and AS MacLean, who had been witnesses
 to the accident and among the first to reach the scene of the crash, without any regard
 for their personal safety, entered the aircraft through the after hatch and attempted
 to remove the harness from the unconscious pilot.  Being unable to unlock the overhead
 hatch, both AS held Lt Caldwell clear of the port side window while it was being smashed
 by the crash crew and, at the same time, succeeded in removing the harness and other
 entangled gear from Lt Caldwell.

	While they were still assisting the pilot, the flames spread aft, a sudden burst
 of fire engulfing the after fuselage section, and one of the officers (Lt Davis)
 assisting in the rescue ordered the two Able Seamen out of the aircraft.  By this
 time, however, the port side window had been cleared and it was possible to remove
 the pilot safely from the burning aircraft.

	Throughout the rescue operation which was executed under the immediate threat
 of an explosion from ruptured gasoline tanks, AS Bouchard and AS MacLean displayed
 consider­ able courage, coolness and initiative.  Shortly after the pilot was rescued
 the aircraft became a mass of flames and was totally destroyed."

	* * * * *

BOWEN, Kennedy Francis, Leading Seaman (27232-H) - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 17 September 1966.  Also awarded the same
 honour were Lieutenant P.A. Blanchard (which see for citation)
 and Lieutenant J.W. McDermott.

	"While at sea on the night of 18 October 1965, advice was received
 by HMCS Bonaventure that HMCS Nipigon was on fire and urgently required
 medical assistance, fire­fighting equipment, and wished to evacuate eight
 seriously burned member of her crew.  Lt Blanchard was pilot of helicopter 'Pedro';
 Lt McDermott was co­pilot and; LS Bowen was employed as aircrewman on the helicopter.
  They made three flights between the two ships delivering fire­fighting equipment and
 medical supplies, returning with the eight injured crew members.  These flights were
 made despite the hazardous conditions that existed at the time, a dark night with
 visibility reduced in rain, and flying a helicopter that was not designed for low
 flying over water at night under instrument conditions.  The skill of Lt Blanchard
 and Lt McDermott, coupled with their devotion to duty and complete disregard for
 their own personal safety, allowed eight men to receive urgently required medical
 treatment only available on HMCS Bonaventure.

	Entirely on his own initiative, LS Bowen stationed himself in the main cabin
 door and directed the aircraft from ship to ship.  In the latter stages of the
 approach, he found it necessary to stand on the main cabin step so he could give
 the pilots information on deck movement.  Without this steady stream of information,
 the pilots, whose vision was restricted by darkness and rain would have found the
 mission extremely difficult to complete.  In addition, LS Bowen supervised and
 assisted in the loading of the aircraft, and by his alertness and calm efficiency
 expedited the removal of the casualties.  During this entire operation, LS Bowen
 exhibited a high degree of initiative, airmanship and courage which reflects great
 credit upon himself."

	* * * * *

BROOKS, David Reginald, Able Seaman (TD) (5879­E) - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 18 October 1950.

	* * * * *

BUNCH, William Sterling, Leading Seaman, CD (26636­H) - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
- RCN / HMCS Athabaskan - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 3 April 1965.

	PO Jensen attempted to lay the ship's whaler to within a few feet of the
 plunging stern section of the wrecked tanker (S.S. Amphialos).  His tiller
 broke but he still was able to manoeuvre clear of the ship.  He later spotted
 a man in the water and was able to direct the HMCS Athabaskan to the man for
 the rescue.

	LS Bunch was the first man over the side of HMCS Athabaskan to help men from
 the SS Amphialos up the scramble nets.  He directed the hoistman on deck to pull
 up the stretchers with the injured and exhausted seaman and generally took charge
 of this portion of the rescue mission.

	* * * * *

CALLIGHEN, James Ernest, Petty Officer 2nd Class
 - Legionnaire - Legion of Merit (United States of America) - RCN / HMCS Haida
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 2 December 1950.
  Also decorated were Lieutenant-Commander E.T.G. Madgwick,
 Surgeon Captain E.H. Lee (Legion of Merit, Degree of Officer) and
 Chief Petty Officer 1st Class W.R. Roberts (Degree of Legionnaire).
  See Crowsnest, December 1949 and January 1951.

	"In recognition of exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance
 of outstanding service in the rescue of the crew of a B­29 aircraft of the
 United States Air Force which crashed at sea near Bermuda in November 1949."

Crowsnest gives this account of PO2 Callighen's role:
	"He was coxswain of the Haida's seaboat.  He has been honoured for outstanding
 initiative and coolness in taking his whaler through heavy seas, taking in tow
 the survivors boat and bringing them alongside HMCS Haida."

	* * * * *

CHISHOLM, John Allister, Lieutenant, CD (0­13631) - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN / HMCS Bonaventure - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 1 October 1966.

	"At approximately 1530 hours on 2 November 1964, while HMCS Bonaventure was
 undergoing a minor refit in St. John, New Brunswick, a fire was reported on
 Number 5 Deck in F Section.  The ship's emergency party was immediately ordered
 to the scene and as Engineer Officer of the Day, Lt Chisholm took charge.  With
 large volumes of dense black and nauseating smoke issuing from the compartment,
 reports of explosion and intense heat, and the storage of dangerous materials in
 nearby compartments, Lt Chisholm quickly assessed the fire as being of major
 proportions constituting a great danger to the ship.  Dressing in Chemox breathing
 apparatus, he entered the compartment to personally survey the situation prior to
 directing the fire fighting operation.  On approaching the fire area, he heard cries
 from an adjacent smoke filled compartment and on entering, found a stranded workman
 in a state of panic.  He led the workman past the fire area to safety of the
 compartment above, where resuscitation was then administered.  Returning to the
 fire area, he found another workman similarly trapped and in a similar manner led
 this man to safety.  Returning a third time, he found the body of a man who had
 succumbed to asphyxia lying in the farthest corner of the burning compartment.  With
 the assistance of his back­up assistant, Lt Chisholm carried the body from the fire
 area.  Having been assured no other personnel were in the fire area, he re­entered
 the burning compartment to direct the fire fighting at the face of the fire.  By his
 prompt courageous action, and disregard for his own safety, Lt Chisholm averted further
 loss of life and greater damage to the ship.  His courage and leadership under hazardous
 conditions was an inspiration to the ship's fire fighting team who successfully
 contained and extinguished the fire."

	* * * * *

CORSCADDEN, Arthur Latimer, Sub-Lieutenant (Posthumous) - Albert Medal
 - Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps 'Ark Royal'
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette 04 August 1956.

	"On 6th June 1954, this officer took nine Sea Cadets of the
 training establishment Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps 'Ark Royal' in
 a whaler on a training exercise on Lake Ontario.  During the exercise,
 a sudden gust of wind struck the sail of the whaler and capsized it.  This
 competent officer had given the correct orders in an endeavour to prevent
 capsizing and also in his instructions to the cadets in the water
 to "stick to the boat".  However, Cadet Missen, who appeared to have been
 hit by the boom when the boat capsized, drifted away. He could not swim in
 the cold water and S/Lt Corscadden swam after him.  This officer put a life
 jacket on the cadet and lashed him to himself saying "come on son, I will
 help keep you up".  Unfortunately the water was so cold (46 degrees F) that
 he could not keep the cadet afloat and they both sank before help arrived.  The
 gallant action of this junior officer is in keeping with the highest traditions
 of the Royal Canadian Navy."
	* * * * *

DURST, George William, Petty Officer 1st Class, CD (22971­H)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN / HMCS Nipigon
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 05 August 1967.

	"While at sea on the night of 18 October 1965, two explosions occurred
 aboard HMCS Nipigon with a resulting flash fire.  LS White and AS Gray entered
 the area of the fire to rescue an unconscious seaman while PO Durst was instrumental
 in the initial search of the damaged area of the ship and assisted PO Perry in the
 removal of smouldering material from the smoke filled area."
	* * * * *

EARLEY, David William, Able Seaman Stoker Mechanic (R-600)
 - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN(R)
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 28 October 1950.

	* * * * * 

FINK, Francis Roger, Lieutenant-Commander (P), CD (0-23625) - George Medal
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 07 February 1959
 and London Gazette of 20 February 1959.
  Also honoured were Lieutenant-Commander (P) BEEMAN, and John Henault.

  Started in RCAF as Aircraftsman 2nd Class 16 December 1941 with RCAF Construction Unit.
  Sergeant RCAF 1 October 1942.
  Pilot training at RCAF Regina for Initial Flight Training School, RCAF Fort William
 for Elementary Flight Training School and RCAF Yorkton for Service Flight Training School.
  Commissioned as posted to RCAF Summerside as GR School Instructor and Staff Pilot.
  Transferred to RNVR 1 October 1944.
  To HMS Seaborn (Halifax) 4 April 1945.
  To HMS Macaw and then HMS Tealing.
  To No. 803 RN Squadron as Pilot.
  To RNAS Arbroath and RNAS Nutts Corner.
  Demobilized 1 February 1946.
  Appointed Lieutenant (P) (Short Service Appointment) RCN 16 June 1949.
  To RCAF Trenton for Flying Refresher Course 1949.
  To RNAS Lossiemouth for OTU 1950 and to RNAS Eglinton for OTU 1950.
  HMS Illustrious for Deck Landing Qualification 1950.
  To No. 826 Squadron Shearwater for service on HMCS Magnificent 1951.
  To No. 881 Squadron at Shearwater for service on HMCS Magnificent in 1952.
  To USN/USMC for Helicopter Training in 1953.
  Served on exchange with the US Marine Corps 1953 at USMC El Toro.
  To HMR 161 Troop Support Squadron (First US Marine Division) for Korean War Service
 at 38th Parallel 1953.
  Permanent Commission and promoted LCdr (P) 1 January 1954.
  Commanding Officer HS-50 Squadron from September 1957 to July 1960
 (flying off of HMCS Bonaventure).
  To NDHQ for Duty with Director, Naval Air Requirements in 1959.
  Promoted Cdr (P) RCN 1 January 1961 and to NDHQ as Assistant Director of
 Naval Air Requirements.
  To Shearwater as Training Officer at Aircrew and Technical Schools in 1962.
  To Shearwater as Air Operations Officer in 1963.
  Retired 25 February 1966.
  Flew commercial helicopters in Northern Canada for nine years after
 retirement and then worked for eleven years as Legal Administrator for
 a Red Deer, Alberta, Law Firm.
  Had 195 Carrier Landings including 12 night landings.
  Survived a midair Seafire collision in 1945 and an Avenger engine 
failure and ocean ditching in 1951.   

	From page 60, 'A History of Canadian Naval Aviation 1918­1962:  "Out
 of control the Liberian freighter 'Kismet II' drifted on to the jagged
 rocks at the base of 1,000­foot cliffs of Cape Lawrence on Cape Breton
 Island.  A Sikorsky piloted by LCdr J.H. Beeman and LCdr Francis Roger
 Fink dipped low over the stricken ship in attempts to rescue the crew
 but was unable to do so owing to the strong winds and rough sea, which
 also prevented the launching of small boats to go alongside.  During the
 anxious night, a truck loaded with rescue equipment, life­lines and
 breeches buoys arrived at the top of the cliff after an arduous trip
 behind a snow­plough.  Conditions had improved slightly on the morrow
 but it was still an extremely hazardous manoeuvre to approach the
 'Kismet'.  Signs were made to the men to clear a landing space aft;
 when obstructions such as the after binnacle guard­ rails and so on,
 had been removed, the helicopter slipped in sideways and balanced with
 power on, while the first load of passengers scrambled aboard.  Four trips
 were necessary to bring off the 21­man crew, the Captain's dog and the ship's cat.'

	The full citation amplifies this extract:  "On November 26, 1955
 Lieutenant Commander J.H. BEEMAN, pilot; Lieutenant Commander F.R. FINK, co­pilot;
 and two seamen were jointly responsible for saving the 21 members of the crew of
 the Liberian Freighter S.S. 'KISMET II', which had run aground on the rocky coast
 of Cape Breton Island against a cliff which rose almost vertically from the sea
 to a height of some 400 feet and was being pounded to pieces by heavy seas.  It
 was decided by the authorities concerned that the rescue could not be effected
 from shore while heavy seas and reefs made any attempts from sea impossible.

	At 0815 hours on November 26, 1955 LCdr Beeman and LCdr Fink, and the two seamen
 who had volunteered to be crew members, flew his helicopter towards the wreck.  The
 wind had veered slightly and he found that along the cliff face, the turbulence was
 not so great and he was able to approach close to the 'KISMET II' and still maintain
 control of his helicopter.  His co­pilot and crew, by hand signals, were able to make
 the crew of the ship understand that they wanted the after steering platform cleared
 away by the removal of ventilators, rails, etc., so that the helicopter could land.
  This operation was accomplished in short order and LCdr Beeman succeeded in balancing
 his helicopter on the deck on three wheels;  the fact that fairly heavy turbulence was
 still being encountered and that the cliff was only about 25 feet away, made any attempt
 at a rescue by hoist, with the helicopter hovering, impractical.  He embarked four
 members of the ship's crew, and by watching his opportunity between gusts, was able
 to take off from his precarious position and land them ashore.  Leaving his co­pilot
 and one seaman behind, LCdr Beeman made a second trip to the 'KISMET II', this time
 removing 7 of the crew.  LCdr Beeman was considerably fatigued by this time, and the
 third and fourth trips in which the remaining 10 members of the ship's crew were
 removed, were made by the co­pilot LCdr Fink."

Medals of Commander Francis Roger FINK, GM, CD, RCN
	George Medal (EIIR) ­ CVSM ­ 39/45 War Medal ­ UN Korea ­ CD and Bar

	* * * * *

GRAY, Wendell Tolson, Able Seaman (49957­H) - British Empire Medal (for Gallantry) (BEM)
 - RCN / HMCS Nipigon - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 August 1967
 and London Gazette of 4 August 1967.

	"At approximately 2030 hours on 18th October 1965, while at sea, two
 explosions occurred in 12 Mess on HMCS Nipigon.  The force of the explosions
 blew the locked cover off a tank containing JP5 helicopter fuel causing a flash
 fire in the Mess.  Directly above the Mess was a compartment containing ammunition.
  At the time of the explosion, Able Seaman Gray was in the main cafeteria.
  Immediately making his way to the upper deck, he was instructed by the Damage
 Control Officer to break out all available breathing equipment.  When informed
 that LS White had entered the Mess to free an unconscious man, he quickly donned
 same, and following the Leading Seaman into the mess, assisted in the evacuation
 of the man to the mortar well on the deck above.  The Mess at this time was filled
 with fumes from the JP5 fuel and heavy smoke.  Returning to the area, AS Gray entered
 the Mess on three successive occasions with fire fighting and other equipment and
 assisted the damage control parties in clearing the Mess of the smouldering material.
  Although the youngest in the group, AS Gray assisted in the rescue of a comrade,
 entered the Mess on several occasions where there was an open JP5 fuel tank, and
 assisted the damage control parties with the fire­fighting and removal of smouldering
 materials.  His actions throughout this incident, in the face of serious injury or
 possible death, have brought credit not only to himself, but also to his ship and
 the Canadian Forces."

	* * * * *

GREER, Norman Robert, Able Seaman (106­408­065) ­ Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN / HMCS Kootenay - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 20 April 1968.

	"At approximately 1240 hours, August 15, 1967, at the Sault Lock Jetty
 in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, a mother screamed that her son had fallen
 into the water.  Crew members from HMCS Kootenay immediately rushed to
 the jetty's edge and saw a child, of about four years of age and a man
 splashing about in the water between the jetty and the ship.  After
 unsuccessful attempts to reach the two in the water and realizing that
 the man was unable to assist the terrified child, who had by now submerged,
 AS Greer jumped fully clothed into the water, grasped the child and handed
 him to the crew members.  He then assisted the man to the jetty's edge and
 out of the water.  It was later learned that the man was the child's father
 and apparently a good swimmer.  By this fine display of courage, AS Greer
 ventured his own life to save the lives of others, his actions being in the
 best traditions of the Canadian Armed Forces."	

	* * * * *

GRENIER, Joseph Richard, Able Seaman (18605­H) - British Empire Medal (for Gallantry) (BEM)
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 4 June 1955.

	"For Bravery in rescuing a boy from the 200 foot cliff face at Quebec City."

	* * * * *

GUEST, Orville Earl, Petty Officer Second Class (PO2) (51775­H)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 13 June 1959.

	* * * * *

HASLER, Frederick George, Petty Officer Second Class (PO2) (15988­H)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 July 1963.

	* * * * *

JAMES, Wallace Elmer ("Sandy"), Lieutenant (P) (0­36165)
  -  Member - Order of the British Empire - RCN
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 4 June 1955.
  Originally proposed as an Air Force Cross.

  Born Springwater 26 August 1919.
  Air Technician RCAF in 1941.
  To RCAF St. Thomas for training in 1942.
  #4 SFTS at Saskatoon in 1942.
  RCAF Saskatoon for Initial Training School in 1943.
  RCAF Regina for Elementary Training School 1943.
  Back to RCAF Saskatoon for #4 Service Flight Training School.
  Promoted Pilot Officer RCAF 1 September 1944.
  Commando course in Calgary 1944.
  RCAF Demobilization Centre Vancouver 1944.
  Transferred to RNVR for Fleet Air Arm 1 February 1945.
  To HMS Seaborn (Halifax) 1945.  HMS Macaw 1945.
  RNAS Tern Hill for Harvard Single Engine Conversion 1945.
  HMS Zeale for Carrier Familiarization 1945.
  To RNAS Yeovilton for Operational Training 1945.
  Repatriated to Canada and demobilized 1 December 1945.
  Transferred to RCAF 1 April 1946 as Sergeant Technician
  Transferred to RCN 1 December 1946 as Petty Officer Air Mechanic (E) at Naden
 for New Entry Training.
  To HMS Warrior for 19th Carrier Air Group 1947.
  To RNAS Eginton for 803 Squadron 1945.
  Chief Petty Officer RCN 1950.
  Commissioned with Short Service Appointment as Lieutenant (P) 21 February 1952.
  RCAF Calgary for Refresher Flying Training in 1952
  To Shearwater to #743 Squadron for Avenger Checkout.
  Later in 1952 to Niagara for training with USNAS Pensacola Helicopter Conversion.
  In 1953 to USNAS Lakehurst New Jersey for HU-2 Squadron.
  USS Edisto for Arctic Re-Supply 1953.
  To USCGS Westwind for Canadian Arctic Re-Supply in 1953.
  Back to USNAS Lakehurst N.J. for HU-2 Squadron in 1953.
  To Shearwater and HMCS Magnificent for HU-21 Squadron as Pilot in 1953.
  To Naden for duty with VU-33 Squadron as Senior Pilot and as Helicopter Instruction 1955.
  Selected for permanent Commission and promoted to LCdr (P) RCN.
  To Shearwater for HU-21 Squadron as Commanding Officer 1961.
  To Naden for RCN Diving Establishment (West) as Administration Officer 1962.
  Retired 28 August 1964.
After RCN service flew helicopters on contract and a part owner in Trans-West Helicopters at Vancouver. Flew over 17,000 Flying Hours. He died in Victoria on 13 April 1999. "For gallantry in the rescue by helicopter of an injured lighthouse keeper off the coast of Nova Scotia" Helicopter was HUP­3 51­16621. "In October 1954 when word was received that the lighthouse keeper on St. Paul's Island in the Cabot Strait had a fractured skull and badly wounded arm as the result of a dynamite explosion, Lt. W.E. James, RCN, with one crewman, flew a Piasecki HUP­3 to Sydney, where he picked up a doctor before continuing the flight in gale­force winds and poor visibility. After landing on the island in swirling snow the pilot had to keep the rotors going for the three­quarters of an hour that the doctor was attending the patient and bringing him to the machine. The return to Sydney was made without any trouble and the Piasecki finally arrived back at base after a mission lasting 8.5 hours." (from "A History of Canadian Naval Aviation")
	* * * * *

JENSEN, Eric Robert, Petty Officer Second Class (PO2), CD (26822­H)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN / HMCS Athabaskan
 - Awarded as per 3 April 1965.

	PO Jensen attempted to lay the ship's whaler to within a few feet
 of the plunging stern section of the wrecked tanker (S.S. Amphialos).  His
 tiller broke but he still was able to manoeuvre clear of the ship.  He later
 spotted a man in the water and was able to direct the HMCS Athabaskan to the
 man for the rescue.

	LS Bunch was the first man over the side of HMCS Athabaskan to help men
 from the SS Amphialos up the scramble nets.  He directed the hoistman on
 deck to pull up the stretchers with the injured and exhausted seaman and
 generally took charge of this portion of the rescue mission.

	* * * * *

JOHNSON, Robert Barry, Petty Officer Second Class (PO2) (51695­H)
 ­ Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 22 January 1955.

	* * * * *
	
JOHNSON, Robert John Harold, Leading Seaman (429­269­475)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 20 April 1968.

	"On the afternoon of December 9, 1967, in the village of Akudlik, a village
 near Fort Churchill, Manitoba, an elderly Eskimo fell asleep on his chesterfield
 whilst smoking a cigarette, subsequently causing the chesterfield to smoulder,
 filling the house with smoke.  LS Johnson, who was out walking with his wife,
 noticed the smoke seeping from the front door.  He sent his wife next door to
 notify the fire department.  LS Johnson then entered the house on four successive
 occasions to rescue a baby and the elderly Eskimo, then searched the house for
 other occupants and then single­handedly and with considerable effort, removed
 the smouldering chesterfield.  This fine display of courage was enacted without
 thought for his own personal safety."

	* * * * *

JUDSON, Malcolm W., Petty Officer Second Class (PO2) (R-2194)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN(R)
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 30 July 1955.

	* * * * *

LAY, Joseph Henry Kenneth, Chief Petty Officer, CD (24909­H) - George Medal (GM)
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 25 April 1964.

	"At 0700 on 13 January, 1962, CPO Joseph Henry Kenneth Lay and
 a companion, CPO W. Thompson were at Western Head, Lockeport, Nova Scotia,
 preparing to go duck hunting.  At the time there was intermittent snow with
 onshore winds from the N.N.E. at 20 knots and air temperature 27 degree F.,
 sea temperature was 40 degrees F. with waves up to four feet except off shore
 where local tidal effect caused rip tides and waves 10 to 15 feet in height.
  While standing on the shore, deciding whether to go duck shooting or not in
 view of the weather conditions, they were informed that an overturned boat had
 been sighted and a cry for help heard.  Bystanders reported there was a small
 boat some distance away which CPO Lay and his companion located and skidded
 over the snow some three quarters of a mile before launching into the sea.  Due
 to the size of the boat, it was not possible for both CPOs to attempt the rescue.
  However, CPO Lay, dressed in heavy winter clothing and without regard for his own
 personal safety, rowed the boat to the overturned craft.  Realizing his boat would
 capsize if he attempted to bring the delirious man into it, CPO Lay persuaded him
 to hang onto the stern.  Due to his exhausted condition, the man was unable to do
 so.  CPO Lay then positioned his feet over the man's arms and held him in place.  In
 this manner, CPO Lay rowed his small eight foot boat some 300 yards to the shore
 through the hazardous, shoaling waters and rip tide with seas ranging in height to
 fifteen feet.  In view of the sea state and prevailing weather conditions, this
 rescue demanded great courage, endurance and alertness.  CPO Lay undoubtedly risked
 his own life in saving Mr. Fiske from death by drowning."

	* * * * *

LEE, Eric Hammond, Surgeon Captain  -  Officer - Legion of Merit (United States of America)
 - RCN / PMO HMCS Magnificent - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 2 December 1950.
  Also decorated were Lieutenant Commander E.T.G Madgwick (Legion of Merit, Degree of Officer)
 plus Chief Petty Officer 1st Class W.H. Roberts
 and Petty Officer 2nd Class J.E. Callighen (Degree of Legionnaire).
  See Crowsnest, issues of December 1949 and January 1951.
  He was Principal Medical Officer aboard HMCS Magnificent,
 transferring to Haida in treacherous seas, 19 November 1949,
 to treat survivors of B-29.  Joined at HMCS Unicorn 1941.
  In 1944 was at Naval HQ on Staff and transferred from RCNVR to RCN.
  PMO HMCS Magnificent in 1949.
  He then became the Command Medical Officer of the Atlantic Command at HMCS Stadacona 1950.
  To NDHQ as Medical Director General in 1952.
  To Naval Headquarters as Medical Director General in 1954.

Surgeon Lieutenant (Temporary) RCNVR           15 October  1941
Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander (Temporary) RCNVR 01 July     1944
Acting Surgeon Commander RCN                   01 January  1945
Surgeon Captain RCN                            01 February 1950
Surgeon Commodore RCN                          01 July     1954

	"In recognition of exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance
 of outstanding service in the rescue of the crew of a B­29 aircraft of the
 United States Air Force which crashed at sea near Bermuda in November 1949."

The Crowsnest gives this account:
	"Surgeon Captain Lee, having been transferred by boat from HMCS Magnificent
 to HMCS Haida in treacherous seas, administered to the needs of the exhausted
 and suffering survivors in an efficient and humane manner.  His conduct was a
 credit to the high standards of both the Naval Service and the Medical Profession."


LEE, Eric Hammond, Surgeon Captain  -  Officer - Order of St. John of Jerusalem (OStJ)
 - RCN / Command Medical Officer of Atlantic Command
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 4 July 1953.


LEE, Eric Hammond, Surgeon Commodore, OStJ
  -  Commander - Order of St. John of Jerusalem (CStJ)
 - RCN / Naval Medical Director - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 11 September 1954.

	* * * * *	

LEWIS, Kenneth Ewart, Commander (E), CD (0­41970) - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 31 October 1959.

	* * * * *

PERRY, Arnold John, Chief Petty Officer Second Class (CPO2), CD (14525­H)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct  - RCN / HMCS Nipigon
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 August 1967.

	"While at sea on the night of 18 October 1965, two explosions occurred
 aboard HMCS Nipigon with a resulting flash fire.  LS White and AS Gray
 entered the area of the fire to rescue an unconscious seaman while PO Durst
 was instrumental in the initial search of the damaged area of the ship and
 assisted PO Perry in the removal of smouldering material from the smoke filled area."

	* * * * *

MACLEAN, Angus Kenneth, Able Seaman (37499-H) - George Medal (GM)
 - RCN / Naval Air Station Shearwater
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 26 April 1960 and London Gazette of 26 March 1960.

	"On the afternoon of the 20th August, 1959, a CS2F Tracker (1519) aircraft
 of Anti­Submarine Squadron 880 crashed on take­off while carrying out Field
 Carrier Landing Practice at the Naval Air Station Shearwater, Nova Scotia.  The
 aircraft stalled at about 150 feet from the ground and went into an uncontrolled
 slow roll before landing, right side up, in a revetment adjacent to the tower
 at Shearwater.

	The co­pilot Lt (P) Roger D. Nantel, RCN, managed to escape from the plane but
 the pilot, Lt (P) G.A. Caldwell, RCN, who was unconscious, remained in the aircraft
 which was on fire.  Able Seaman Jacques P.G. Bouchard, and Able Seaman MacLean, who
 had been witnesses to the accident and among the first to reach the scene of the crash,
 without any regard for their personal safety, entered the aircraft through the after
 hatch and attempted to remove the harness from the unconscious pilot.  Being unable
 to unlock the overhead hatch, both AS held Lt Caldwell clear of the port side window
 while it was being smashed by the crash crew and, at the same time, succeeded in
 removing the harness and other entangled gear from Lt Caldwell.
	
	While they were still assisting the pilot, the flames spread aft, a sudden burst
 of fire engulfing the after fuselage section, and one of the officers (Lt Davis)
 assisting in the rescue ordered the two Able Seamen out of the aircraft.  By this
 time, however, the port side window had been cleared and it was possible to remove
 the pilot safely from the burning aircraft.

	Throughout the rescue operation which was executed under the immediate threat
 of an explosion from ruptured gasoline tanks, AS Bouchard and AS MacLean displayed
 consider­ able courage, coolness and initiative.  Shortly after the pilot was rescued
 the aircraft became a mass of flames and was totally destroyed."
	* * * * *

MacHATTIE, Frederick George, Surgeon Captain, CD
 - Serving Brother - Order of St. John of Jerusalem
 - RCN ­ Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 11 September 1954.

	* * * * *

McCORRISTON, Roy Rol, Leading Seaman (31965­H) - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canda Gazette of 20 January 1968.

	"On May 20, 1967, LS McCorriston was assisting in the repair of a private
 boat when a flash fire occurred.  The owner, who was in the cabin, was trapped
 by the flames.  With complete disregard for his own personal safety, LS McCorriston
 entered the cabin and pulled the owner to safety, only to have him make a dash for
 the water, some 100 yards distant.  Realizing the consequence of this action, he seized
 the man and rolling him on the rocky ground, removed the burning jacket and smothered
 the remaining flames with his own body and bare hands, thereby saving the man, who
 suffered from second and third degree burns, from further injury."  

	* * * * *

McDERMOTT, John William, Lieutenant (0­48521) ­ Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 ­ RCN / HMCS Bonaventure - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 17 September 1966.

  Born Fort Erie, Ontario 30 March 1935.
  Officer Cadet RCN (Short Service Appointment - SSA) 12 September 1954
 and to Venture for Officer Training.
  To HMCS Ontario and HMCS Sioux for Training.
  Midshipman RCN 1 September 1956 and to Niagara for Pilot Training.
  To USNAS Pensacola in 1956 for pilot training.
  To USNAS Kingsville, Texas, for Advanced flying Training in 1945.
  To USS Antietam for Deck Landing Qualifications in 1956.
  Promoted Acting Sub-Lieutenant (P) (SSA) 1 March 1958 and
 to HMCS Bonaventure with HU-21 Squadron for Helicopter Conversion in PEDRO Detachment.
  Sub-Lieutenant (P) (SSA) 1 March 1959 and to HMCS Bonaventure for duty with HS-50 Squadron.
  Permanent Commission as Lieutenant (P) RCN 1 October 1960.
  To Niobe for Loan to RN as Helicopter Pilot on HMS Ark Royal with No. 815 RN Squadron
 flying Westland Wessex HAS Mark 1 helicopters.
  To HMS Osprey for service with HMS Hermes for 737 RN (Wessex OTU) Squadron
 as Flying Instructor in 1963.
  To HMCS Cap de la Madeleine as Operations Officer and Watchkeeper in 1964.
  To HU-21 flying from HMCS Bonaventure and HMCS Ottawa as Squadron Pilot
 and Flying instructor in 1965 (received Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct).
  To CFB halifax for Canadian Forces Maritime Warfare School on Staff as
 ASW helicopter instructor in 1969.
  To HU-21 Squadron as helicopter instructor and PEDRO Deployment in 1969.
  Also with HMCS Ottawa, HMCS Margaree and HMCS Provider with HS-50 Squadron
 as squadron pilot in 1969.
  Major (pilot) on 1 June 1971 and to MARCOM HQ as Staff Officer (Flight Safety).
  To CFB Halifax for university Education (St. Mary's University) 1973 to 1975.
  Promoted LCol 1 January 1975 and appointed Commanding Officer of HS-423.
  To Canadian Defence Liaison Staff (Washington) for studies at USAF AFB Maxwell
 for Air Warfare College Course in 1977.
  To NDHQ for Directorate of Maritime Aviation as Section Head
 for Sea King and Trackers in 1978.
  To Canadian Defence Liaison Staff (Washington) as Senior Staff Officer
 Maritime and Land Aviation and as Assistant Canadian Naval and Air Attache 1981.
  Retired 30 March 1987.
  Joined Aerospatiale as Canadian Marketing Director for Helicopter Division 1987.
  Joined Allied Signal Ocean Systems as Canadian Marketing Representative in 1988.
  Total Flying hours:  4,349.  Flew Goodyear Blimp Enterprise.

	"While at sea on the night of 18 October 1965, advice was received
 by HMCS Bonaventure that HMCS Nipigon was on fire and urgently required
 medical assistance, fire­fighting equipment, and wished to evacuate eight
 seriously burned member of her crew.  Lt Blanchard was pilot of helicopter
 'Pedro'; Lt McDermott was co­pilot and; LS Bowen was employed as aircrewman
 on the helicopter.  They made three flights between the two ships delivering
 fire­fighting equipment and medical supplies, returning with the eight injured
 crew members.  These flights were made despite the hazardous conditions that
 existed at the time, a dark night with visibility reduced in rain, and flying
 a helicopter that was not designed for low flying over water at night under
 instrument conditions.  The skill of Lt Blanchard and Lt McDermott, coupled
 with their devotion to duty and complete disregard for their own personal
 safety, allowed eight men to receive urgently required medical treatment only
 available on HMCS Bonaventure.

	* * * * *

McLEAN, Timothy Blair, Surgeon Captain, CD
 - Serving Brother - Order of St. John of Jerusalem (SBStJ)
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 4 July 1953.

  Born in Fairydell, Alberta on 29 September 1910.
  Served as an Ordinary Seaman in the RCNVR in 1929.
  Joined RCNVR on 18 September 1939 and served as Medical Officer
 on board HMCS Saguenay, HMCS Fraser (survived sinking) and HMCS Margaree (survived sinking).
  He then went to HMCS Naden on the medical staff.
  His final WW2 posting was as the Principal Medical Officer (PMO) on board HMCS Uganda.
  He returned to HMCS Naden and acted as the PMO and Instruction Medical Officer
 for the RCN Hospital Esquimalt in 1947.
  In 1954 he went to Naval Headquarters as Deputy Medical Director-General
 and in 1958 to NDHQ at Medical Director-General.
  He was Deputy Surgeon General (Professional) of the Canadian Forces in 1958
 and then Surgeon General in 1960.
  He was made a Queen's Honorary Physician (QHP) in 1960.
  Later promoted to Commander - Order of St. John (CStJ).

Surgeon Lieutenant RCN               18 September 1939
Acting Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander               1943
Surgeon Lieutenant-Commander         01 June      1944
Acting Surgeon Commander             01 October   1945
Surgeon Commander                    01 July      1947
Surgeon Captain                      01 January   1953
Surgeon Commodore                    08 September 1958
Surgeon Rear-Admiral                 01 January   1960  Queen's Honorary Physician

	* * * * *

MADGWICK, Edward Thomas George, Lieutenant-Commander, CD
  -  Officer - Legion of Merit (United States of America)
 - CO HMCS Haida - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 2 December 1950.
  Also decorated were Surgeon Captain E.H. Lee (Legion of Merit, Degree of Officer)
 plus Chief Petty Officer 1st Class W.H. Roberts and Petty Officer 2nd Class J.E. Callighen
 (Degree of Legionnaire).

  Madgwick later awarded DSC for services in Korea.
  See Crowsnest for December 1949 and January 1951.
Commanded HMCS Huron 28 February 1950 to 23 March 1950 as LCdr.
Commanded HMCS Haida on 19 November 1953 when she rescued 18 survivors
 from a B-29 which had crashed near Bermuda three days earlier.
MADGWICK. Edward Thomas George "Mook", 0-45770
RCN Special entry No.36, Cdt [31.8.34] HMS FROBISHER,
Mid [1.9.35] HMS DELHI, HMS DEVONSHIRE (1.5.37-?) HMS SUSSEX,
HMS VICTORY, HMS DRYAD, S/Lt [1.1.38] HMS EXCELLENT (3.1.38-?)
HMCS RESTIGOUCHE( (17.11.38-?) Lt(G) [1.5.39] RCNB Hfx 1940,
HMS SAMBRO, HMCS OTTAWA(H60) DD, (9.6.40-?)
HMS EXCELLENT 1941,
HMCS IROQUOIS (G89) DD, stand by (1.10.42-29.11.42)
HMCS IROQUOIS (G89) DD, (30.11.42-?)
HMCS ONTARIO (53) L/Cr, stand by, (10.6.44-25.4.45)
HMCS ONTARIO (53) L/Cr, (26.4.45-?)
NSHQ 1945, HMCS NIOBE(D/S) XO, (13.11.46-?) LCdr(G) [1.5.47]
HMCS NIOBE (D/S) XO, & Gunnery Liaison Officer, (23.8.47-?)
HMCS HAIDA (G63) DD, CO, (16.5.49-12.1.50)
CD~[?] HMCS HURON (216) DD, CO, (28.2.50-22.3.50)
HMCS HURON (216) DD, CO, (7.4.50-23.9.51)
US-Legion of Merit~[2.12.50] Cdr [1.1.51] DSC~[10.5.52]
Awarded Commander-Legiom of Merit by USA~[16.4.55]
HMCS MICMAC(214) DD, CO, (2.9.55-8.7.56) Capt [1.7.56]
"In recognition of exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service in the rescue of the crew of a B­29 aircraft of the United States Air Force which crashed at sea near Bermuda in November 1949." Crowsnest digest of award states: "For exhibiting the finest type of seamanship, manoeuvred his ship expertly, and permitting his ship's whaler to be despatched to bring the survivors alongside HMCS Haida. His excellent seamanship, his initiative and command under difficult sea conditions successfully completed one of the most extensive sea searches in the history of the Western Atlantic."
	* * * * *
MUNCASTER, Douglas Albert ("Duke"), Lieutenant - George Medal (GM) - RCN
Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 31 December 1955 and London Gazette of 30 December 1955.
Born: 1925.
Doug joined the RCAF in their pilot training program after graduating from Darcy McGee Secondary School in Montreal in 1943. He spent five years in the Royal Navy flying from HMS Ocean in the Mediterranean.
Short Service Appointment 28 August 1950 as Lieutenant (P) in RCN. To Shearwater for VH-21 Squadron as pilot in 1954.
Known as 'Duke', he flew the helicopter from the icebreaker HMCS Labrador which circumnavigated the North American continent in 1954.
To Niobe for Special Service with 845 Squadron in 1955.
Received permanent commission and promoted to LCdr (P) RCN 21 February 1958.
To Shearwater as Senior Pilot of HU-21 in 1958. Commanded HU-21 from July 1964 to 1966.
He retired from the Royal Canadian Navy in 1970.
Married Patricia Whalvin.
They had 4 daughters: Rosemary (Dupuis), Joanna (Chadwick), Heather (Tait), and Jill (Lyall) and one son, Michael.
He also had 14 grandchildren and 2 great-granddaughters
He died in White Rock, B.C. on 24 September 2008.
"Lt Muncaster, with complete disregard for his own safety, was instrumental in saving the life of a pilot who was trapped inside his flaming aircraft after it had crashed. On the afternoon of 9 March 1955, Lt Muncaster was the co­pilot of a Bell Helicopter which had arrived at the site of an aircraft crash, about one mile south of the Royal Canadian Naval Air Station, Shearwater, Nova Scotia. The aircraft­­a Sea Fury, piloted by Sub­Lieutenant(P) John Victor Searle, R.C.N., 0­65687 ­­ had crashed about three minutes earlier, in a heavily wooded area, and it was noted that it had broken in two, the forward section, including the cockpit, being inverted, with the engine on fire. The Helicopter could not land owing to the density of the trees and undergrowth. The pilot, therefore, hovered about fifty yards from the aircraft, where the wood were more sparse while Lieutenant Muncaster jumped to the ground from a height of about eight feet. As Lieutenant Muncaster ran towards the wreckage, one of the fuel tanks exploded. On nearing the forward section of the aircraft, from sound inside the cockpit, he realized that the pilot was alive. The perspex canopy of the cockpit was resting on the ground and pilot was pinned inside. Being unable to open the canopy or break the perspex with his hands or feet, Lieutenant Muncaster found a rock and smashed a hole in it. By this time the flames had reached the cockpit and there was imminent danger of the remaining fuel tanks exploding. The pilot was able to push his head and shoulders through the hole made in the canopy by Lieutenant Muncaster who, after considerable pulling, extricated Sub­Lieutenant Searle from the flaming cockpit and assisted him from the immediate vicinity of the aircraft. The remaining fuel tanks exploded a few minutes later."

	* * * * *

PATTERSON, Donald Victor, Able Seaman (4855­H) - British Empire Medal (BEM)
 - RCN / HMCS Athabaskan - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 3 April 1965
 and London Gazette of 9 April 1965.

	"On the occasion of the rescue on 1st March 1964 of thirty­five crew
 members of S.S. Amphialos from their sinking ship by HMCS Athabaskan,
 Able Seaman Patterson, in his capacity as a ship's diver, dived overboard
 to the aid of a survivor in the water about 70 feet from the ship, and by
 his efforts, was largely responsible for bringing the man safely aboard.  The
 survivor had been floating in his life­jacket in heavy and oil­infested seas
 and by the time Patterson reached him was thoroughly exhausted, covered with
 oil, and helpless.  The seas at the time were running from 10 to 14 feet.  A
 short time later, Able Seaman Patterson, despite the difficult sea conditions
 and oil, was again in the water for approximately 25 minutes attempting to
 guide a life­raft down to the wreck.  Throughout the whole of the rescue operation,
 this man displayed personal courage and skill of a high order."

	* * * * *

REYNOLDS, Loren Henry, Lieutenant (0­63835) - Air Medal (United States of America)
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 October 1966.
  Born May 1951.
  Officer Cadet RCN and Acting Sub-Lieutenant 1 September 1962.
  Promoted Lieutenant RCN 16 August 1966.
  Major (Pilot) in Canadian Forces and LCol on 1 July 1974.
  Commanded No. 443 Squadron in 1978 at CFB Shearwater.
  Promoted Colonel and on staff of Air Command HQ in 1990.

	"The Minister of National Defence has announced that Her Majesty the
 Queen has been graciously pleased to grant unrestricted permission for
 wearing of the following decoration which has been conferred upon the
 undermentioned in recognition of bravery in the saving of life while
 serving as Exchange Officer with the United States Air Force and on
 loan to the United States Coast Guard."
	* * * * *

ROBERTS, William Henry, Chief Petty Officer First Class (CPO1)
 - Legionnaire - Legion of Merit (United States of America) - RCN / HMCS Haida
 ­ Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 2 December 1950.
  Also decorated were LCdr E.T.G. Madgwick,
 Surgeon Captain E.H. Lee (Legion of Merit, Degree of Officer)
 and Petty Officer 2nd Class J.E. Callighen (Degree of Legionnaire).
  See Crowsnest for December 1949 and January 1951.
 Involved as a crewman on HMCS Haida in rescue of 18 survivors of
 a crashed B-29 (19 November 1949).  After serving in HMCS Haida,
 he was stationed at HMCS Stadacona.

	"In recognition of exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance
 of outstanding service in the rescue of the crew of a B­29 aircraft of
 the United States Air Force which crashed at sea near Bermuda in November 1949."

Crowsnest gives this account of CPO1 Roberts role:
	"He directed lowering of seaboat and operations of rescue crew when
 survivors brought alongside.  Full citation commended "his leadership
 and energy in directing his men (which) contributed greatly to the success
 and efficiency" of the rescue.
	* * * * *

ROSE, Charles Clyde, Leading Seaman (27779­E) - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 31 October 1959.
	* * * * *

SCOTT, Donald John, Surgeon Lieutenant (0­65495) - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
  - RCN / HMCS MacKenzie -Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 18 September 1965.
  Born:  Winnipeg, Manitoba on 2 July 1935.
  Joined RCN in September 1959 while medical student at the University of Manitoba.
  Served National Defence Medical Centre 1962 to 1964.
  Joined 2nd Canadian Destroyer Squadron as Medical Officer serving
 on HMCS MacKenzie from 1964 to 1965.
  Went to RCAF Station Winnipeg as Medical Officer 1965 to 1967 and
 qualified as a Flight Surgeon.
  Took post-graduate training in radiology at Queen's University 1967 to 1971.
  Went to Canadian Forces Hospital Halifax in 1971 as a LCdr ("Junior Radiologist")
 and retired in 1982 at a Captain (Commanding Officer of Hospital).
  Moved to Bridgewater, Nova Scotia and continues to practice there into 1998.  
	
	"The 2nd Destroyer Squadron was en route to Japan in February 1965 when a distress
 call was received from an American Oil Tanker.  One of their crew was seriously ill
 and Surgeon Lt Scott was sent by small boat from HMCS MacKenzie to the tanker to care
 for the sick sailor.  The sea was very rough but Lt Scott made it onboard the tanker
 and found that the sailor had a ruptured appendix.  The ship was 36 hours from Guam
 and Lt Scott provided care for the 36 hours of transit.  The sailor lived due to the
 fine care of this officer. 

Medals of Surgeon Captain Donald John Scott, SBStJ, CD:
	Serving Brother, Order of St. John - CD - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct.

	* * * * *

SEAGER, Richard George, Petty Officer First Class (PO1), CD (21822­E)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 31 October 1959.


	* * * * *


SHEPPARD, Howard Alexander, Able Seaman (103­728­969)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 9 April 1968.

	"On the night of September 28, 1967, at Kindley Air Force Base, Bermuda,
 a member of VS880 Air Squadron, became temporarily mentally incapacitated,
 violent and unaware of his actions.  During this period, he dove into the
 shark infested reef area with the intent of "swimming to Canada".  Without
 hesitation and with complete disregard for his own safety, AS Sheppard plunged
 into the sea and succeeded in dragging the man from the water, and with assistance
 took him to hospital.  The actions and bravery of AS Sheppard were in the best
 traditions of the Canadian Armed Forces."


	* * * * *



SMITH, Paul Arnold, Able Seaman (25605­H) - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 7 February 1959.
  LCdr (P) John Henault Beeman, LCdr (P) Fink and PO1 Vipon were also honoured.

	From page 60, 'A History of Canadian Naval Aviation 1918­1962:
  "Out of control the Liberian freighter 'Kismet II' drifted on to
 the jagged rocks at the base of 1,000­foot cliffs of Cape Lawrence
 on Cape Breton Island.  A Sikorsky piloted by LCdr J.H. Beeman and
 LCdr F.R. Fink dipped low over the stricken ship in attempts to rescue
 the crew but was unable to do so owing to the strong winds and rough
 sea, which also prevented the launching of small boats to go alongside.
  During the anxious night, a truck loaded with rescue equipment, life­lines
 and breeches buoys arrived at the top of the cliff after an arduous trip
 behind a snow­plough.  Conditions had improved slightly on the morrow but
 it was still an extremely hazardous manoeuvre to approach the 'Kismet'.
  Signs were made to the men to clear a landing space aft; when obstructions
 such as the after binnacle guard­ rails and so on, had been removed, the
 helicopter slipped in sideways and balanced with power on, while the first
 load of passengers scrambled aboard.  Four trips were necessary to bring
 off the 21­man crew, the Captain's dog and the ship's cat.'

The full citation amplifies this extract:

	"On November 26, 1955 Lieutenant Commander J.H. BEEMAN, pilot;
 Lieutenant Commander F.R. FINK, co­pilot; and two seamen were
 jointly responsible for saving the 21 members of the crew of the
 Liberian Freighter S.S. 'KISMET II', which had run aground on the
 rocky coast of Cape Breton Island against a cliff which rose almost
 vertically from the sea to a height of some 400 feet and was being
 pounded to pieces by heavy seas.  It was decided by the authorities
 concerned that the rescue could not be effected from shore while heavy
 seas and reefs made any attempts from sea impossible.

	At 0815 hours on November 26, 1955 LCdr Beeman and LCdr Fink, and
 the two seamen who had volunteered to be crew members, flew his helicopter
 towards the wreck.  The wind had veered slightly and he found that along
 the cliff face, the turbulence was not so great and he was able to approach
 close to the 'KISMET II' and still maintain control of his helicopter.  His
 co­pilot and crew, by hand signals, were able to make the crew of the ship
 understand that they wanted the after steering platform cleared away by the
 removal of ventilators, rails, etc., so that the helicopter could land.  This
 operation was accomplished in short order and LCdr Beeman succeeded in balancing
 his helicopter on the deck on three wheels;  the fact that fairly heavy turbulence
 was still being encountered and that the cliff was only about 25 feet away, made
 any attempt at a rescue by hoist, with the helicopter hovering, impractical.  He
 embarked four members of the ship's crew, and by watching his opportunity between
 gusts, was able to take off from his precarious position and land them ashore.
	Leaving his co­pilot and one seaman behind, LCdr Beeman made a second trip to
 the 'KISMET II', this time removing 7 of the crew.  LCdr Beeman was considerably
 fatigued by this time, and the third and fourth trips in which the remaining
 10 members of the ship's crew were removed, were made by the co­pilot LCdr Fink."


	* * * * *


STRIZIC, Joseph,Leading Sea Cadet - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 27 December 1956.
  See Sub-Lieutenant Corscadden's citation also.

			"For taking charge of the remaining members of the boat
			 when S/Lt Corscadden was lost."                    


	* * * * *


TAYLOR, William James, Sub-Lieutenant - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct
 - RCN(R) - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 21 January 1952.


	* * * * *


VIPOND, Lawrence William, Petty Officer First Class (PO1) (50165­H)
 - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - RCN - Awarded as per 7 February 1959.
  Also honoured were Lieutenant-Commander (P) F.R. Fink (George Medal),
 Petty Officer L.W. Vipond (Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct) and
 Leading Seaman P.A. Smith (Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct).
  See also Kealey and Russell, A History of Canadian Naval Aviation, 1918-1962.

	From page 60, 'A History of Canadian Naval Aviation 1918­1962:
  "Out of control the Liberian freighter 'Kismet II' drifted on to the
 jagged rocks at the base of 1,000­foot cliffs of Cape Lawrence on Cape
 Breton Island.  A Sikorsky piloted by LCdr J.H. Beeman and LCdr F.R. Fink
 dipped low over the stricken ship in attempts to rescue the crew but was
 unable to do so owing to the strong winds and rough sea, which also prevented
 the launching of small boats to go alongside.  During the anxious night, a truck
 loaded with rescue equipment, life­lines and breeches buoys arrived at the top
 of the cliff after an arduous trip behind a snow­plough.  Conditions had improved
 slightly on the morrow but it was still an extremely hazardous manoeuvre to approach
 the 'Kismet'.  Signs were made to the men to clear a landing space aft; when
 obstructions such as the after binnacle guard­ rails and so on, had been removed,
 the helicopter slipped in sideways and balanced with power on, while the first
 load of passengers scrambled aboard.  Four trips were necessary to bring off
 the 21­man crew, the Captain's dog and the ship's cat.'

	The full citation amplifies this extract:

	"On November 26, 1955 Lieutenant Commander J.H. BEEMAN, pilot;
 Lieutenant Commander F.R. FINK, co­pilot; and two seamen were jointly
 responsible for saving the 21 members of the crew of the Liberian
 Freighter S.S. 'KISMET II', which had run aground on the rocky coast
 of Cape Breton Island against a cliff which rose almost vertically
 from the sea to a height of some 400 feet and was being pounded to
 pieces by heavy seas.  It was decided by the authorities concerned
 that the rescue could not be effected from shore while heavy seas
 and reefs made any attempts from sea impossible.

	At 0815 hours on November 26, 1955 LCdr Beeman and LCdr Fink,
 and the two seamen who had volunteered to be crew members, flew
 his helicopter towards the wreck.  The wind had veered slightly
 and he found that along the cliff face, the turbulence was not
 so great and he was able to approach close to the 'KISMET II' and
 still maintain control of his helicopter.  His co­pilot and crew,
 by hand signals, were able to make the crew of the ship understand
 that they wanted the after steering platform cleared away by the
 removal of ventilators, rails, etc., so that the helicopter could
 land.  This operation was accomplished in short order and LCdr Beeman
 succeeded in balancing his helicopter on the deck on three wheels;
 the fact that fairly heavy turbulence was still being encountered
 and that the cliff was only about 25 feet away, made any attempt at
 a rescue by hoist, with the helicopter hovering, impractical.  He embarked
 four members of the ship's crew, and by watching his opportunity between
 gusts, was able to take off from his precarious position and land them
 ashore.	Leaving his co­pilot and one seaman behind, LCdr Beeman made a
 second trip to the 'KISMET II', this time removing 7 of the crew.  LCdr Beeman
 was considerably fatigued by this time, and the third and fourth trips in which
 the remaining 10 members of the ship's crew were removed, were made by the
 co­pilot LCdr Fink."


	* * * * *


WHITE, Doyle Clement, Leading Seaman (44253­H) - British Empire Medal (for Gallantry) (BEM)
 - RCN / HMCS Nipigon
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 05 August 1967 and London Gazette of 4 August 1967.

	At approximately 2030 hours on 18th October 1965, while at sea, two explosions
 occurred in 12 Mess on HMCS Nipigon.  The force of these explosions blew the
 locked cover off a tank containing JP5 helicopter fuel causing a flash fire in
 the mess.  The compartment directly above the Mess contained ammunition.  At the
 time of the explosion there were eleven men in 12 Mess, one of which was
 Leading Seaman White.  Although burned about the face and hands when escaping
 from the Mess, Leading Seaman White rushed to the Quartermaster's lobby to
 inform the lifebuoy sentry of the explosions in order that Command could be
 informed.  He then returned to the area of the Mess to assist where needed but
 when advised that one man who appeared to be unconscious had not escaped from
 the Mess, immediately donned a set of breathing equipment and re­entered the
 Mess.  The Mess at this time was filled with fumes from the JP5 fuel and heavy
 black smoke.  Freeing the unconscious man, LS White, with the assistance of
 AS Gray who had just entered, carried the man to the foot of the hatch and
 then searched all bunks to ensure no one else was trapped.  Then, with the
 assistance of Able Seaman Gray and other crew members, brought the man up to
 the mortar well on the deck above.  LS White then assisted the damage control
 parties in flooding the JP5 fuel tank with sea water and the removal of
 smouldering material.  Although burned by the initial flash fire, LS White
 alerted Command, re­entered the fume and smoke filled Mess to rescue a comrade,
 and did excellent work in a dangerous area which contained an open JP5 fuel
 tank adjacent to stored ammunition before obtaining medical attention for
 himself.  This fine display of courage in the face of serious injury or
 possible death, is a credit not only to LS White but also his ship and
 the Canadian Forces."


	* * * * *


WELIMAN, Marvin Clare, Surgeon Commander
  -  Serving Brother - Order of St. John of Jerusalem  (SBStJ)
  - RCN - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 11 September 1954.


	* * * * *


WOODS, Allan John, Lieutenant (P) (0­79575)
 - Queen's Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air - RCN
 - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 28 November 1953.
  Short Service Appointment 30 April 1947.
  Lieutenant (P) with seniority 6 April 1946.
  To HMCS Magnificent for 19 Carrier Air Group as pilot in No. 825 Squadron in 1948.
  Permanent Commission.
  To Naval HQ for Special Duty as Officer-in-Charge of Naval Detachment CEPE
 at RCAF Station Edmonton 1953.
  Promoted LCdr (P) RCN 6 April 1954.
  To Naden as with VU-33 in 1954.
  To Niagara, Stadacona as Staff Officer (Air Training) 1956.
  To Naden as Commanding Officer of VU-33 from August 1958 to July 1961.
  For duty as Liaison Officer RCAF Training Command in 1964.

	"A British 'Attacker Jet Aircraft' was being ferried from RCAF Station Namao
 to Halifax for loading on board HMCS Magnificent to return the aircraft to
 Britain.  Lt Woods had an engine flame­out at 30,000 feet 60 miles from
 Sault Ste Marie and despite only having a 2,000 foot ceiling, he made a
 successful dead stick landing.  The fault was repaired and he headed for
 Ottawa where once again at approximately 60 miles out, the engine failed
 again and all attempts at a relight failed.  The plane had an ejection
 seat but Lt Woods chose to save a valuable aircraft and made his second
 dead stick landing of the trip.  He ultimately flew the plane safely to Halifax."

	 * * * * *


	                      CANADIAN in Royal Navy 1950 to 1968 (Excluding KOREA)



BROCK, Patrick Willet, Rear­Admiral, DSO  -  Companion - Order of the Bath (CB)
 - Royal Navy / Flag Officer Middle East (Ismailia and Cyprus)
 - Awarded as per London Gazette of 31 May 1956.
  Born 30 December 1902, Kingston, Ontario.
  Entered the Royal Naval College of Canada (Eighth Term) in 1917
 as a Naval Cadet, RCN at age 14.
  He transferred to RMC for the Spring 1918 term because of the Halifax explosion.
  Went to Esquimalt when the buildings for the new Naval College were ready in Fall 1918.
  Midshipman RCN 1 September 1920.
  To HMS Diana 1920.
  Transferred to Royal Navy in 1921.
  Sub-Lieutenant RN 1924.
  Awarded Admiralty Silver Medal in 1928 for naval history which was accompanied
 by a cash award of 250 pounds.
  Promoted to Lieutenant-Commander, RN on 11 October 1932.
  To HMS Vernon in 1934.
  Promoted Commander, RN on 31 December 1938 and on staff of Admiralty.
  Executive Officer HMS Mauritius in 1942.
  Captain, RN on 31 December 1944.
  Senior Naval Officer Schleswig-Holstein 1946.
  Commanded HMS Kenya in the Far East in 1949 and during the Korean War
 (DSO - LG 29 June 1951, MID, and Bronze Star with V device - LG 29 June 1951).
  Commodore RN as Director of Operations Division in 1951.
  Promoted to Rear-Admiral 1954 and made Flag Officer Middle East (Ismailia and Cyprus).
  To Admiralty Material Requirements Committee in 1956.
  Retired 1959.
  Died at Haslemere, Surrey, UK on 10 October 1988.
Naval Cadet, RCN                        1917  (Royal Naval College of Canada - Age 14)
Midshipman, RCN                       01 September 1920  (Age 17)
Midshipman, RN                          1921  (Served in HMS Diana)
Sub-Lieutenant, RN                    1924  (Awarded Admiralty Silver Medal)
Lieutenant-Commander, RN     11 October      1932  (Served in HMS Vernon)
Commander, RN                          31 December    1938  (Executive Officer HMS Mauritius)
Captain, RN                                 31 December    1944  (Commanding Officer HMS Kenya in Korea)
Commodore, RN                        1951  (Director of Operations Division)
Rear-Admiral, RN                     1954  (Flag Officer Middle East)
Retired                                         1959  (Admiralty Material Requirements Committee)

Medals of Rear-Admiral Patrick Willet BROCK, CB, DSO, RN



	CB - DSO (GVI) - 39/45 Star - Atlantic Star with BAR France & Germany
 - Burma Star - Italy Star - 1939/45 War Medal with MID
 - British Korea Medal with MID - UN Korea - Naval General Service Medal
 - EIIR Coronation Medal - Croix de Guerre (France)
 - Bronze Star with 'V' Device (United States of America)
		Medals held by CFB Esquimalt Museum
	* * * * *