Awards to the Royal Canadian Navy 

 

HONOURS and AWARDS to CANADIAN MERCHANT SEAMEN for WW2

 

 

ALLEN, St. Clair, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - DOT Marine Section Tug 'Cruiser' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946

and London Gazette of 13 June 1946.

Home: Sydney, Nova Scotia.

Served on numerous merchant ships in WW2 including SS Lady Nelson and survived sinking of SS Rosecastle off Newfoundland.

Employed by the Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for Pilotage District of Sydney. He died on 16 July 1997, age 93, in Sydney, Nova Scotia.

"Competent and efficient service, piloted Tug Cruiser which towed the S.S. Pinkney Henderson to Ballast

Grounds Beach, Sydney Harbour, whilst the steamer was on fire, August 31, 1943."

NOTE: For further details, see F.M. MacKenzie.

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ANDERSON, Thomas Colin, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - CN Steamship 'Delwarnic' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945

and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Perry Sound, Ontario.

"Non-operational award, for long continued, faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea during this war. Has been in command of this vessel (Canadian National Steamships Co. DELWARNIC) since she was brought down from the lakes and commissioned for ocean service in November 1941. Captain Anderson has handled this ship in an excellent manner on quick and short turn rounds, with no undue delays. He has been in service in the waters of the Atlantic Coasts of the U.S.A., Canada and Newfoundland, where enemy submarines were known to be operating. He was frequently appointed Commodore of Convoy."

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ATKINS, Maurice Dudley, Second Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship 'Whitehall Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945

and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Brentwood Bay, B.C.

"Joined R.M.S. Empress of Asia April 15, 1941, as a cadet and served in that ship until she was attacked by Japanese bombing planes in Singapore and burned February 5th, 1942. Arrived back in Vancouver, B.C. May 12th, 1942, and joined S.S. H.F. Alexander June 2nd, 1942, served in that vessel until August 15th, 1942, and joined R.M.S. Empress of Canada the following day. Was serving in that vessel when she was torpedoed March 14th, 1943. Returned to Vancouver, B.C. May 6th, 1943, and joined S.S. Mohawk Park, as Third Officer June 18th, 1943, until January 27th, 1944, at which time he left to sit for his Second Mate Examination. He joined this vessel (R.M.S. Whitehall Park) as Second Officer March 16th, 1943. Mr. Atkins was not quite 17 years old when he joined the R.M.S. Empress of Asia and is now just 20 years old."

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ATKINSON, Thomas Mandle, Chief Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship 'Gatineau Park' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Ellenbank Lodge, Maryport, England.

"Long and meritorious service. Devotion to duty and continuous service in dangerous waters, chiefly in North Atlantic during the war."

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BAKER, Otto, Quartermaster - British Empire Medal (BEM) - DOT Marine Section 'Lady Laurier' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Jeddore, Nova Scotia.

"Service 16 years, steady and efficient. His service during the war years has been consistently in keeping with the tradition of British Marine Records and in every way deserving of recognition."

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BALCOM, William James, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Halifax -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette f 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943.

BALCOM. William James, Skr(Temp) [13.9.17] RCN
HMC TR 24, m/s, CO, (16.11.17-5.5.18)
HMCS SEAGULL for HMCS PV II Tr, (6.5.18-?)
HMC TR 6, m/s, CO, (27.5.18-15.8.19)
Capt, MN, Halifax, MBE(Civil)~[6.1.45]

"Valuable public service in connection with navigation."

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BANNERMAN, Thomas Campbell, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - CN Steamship 'Cavalier' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"In Command of the S.S. Cevelier (Canadian National Steamships) between Canada and/or the United States Atlantic Coast Ports and the British West Indies throughout the whole of the present war period during which time he has rendered exemplary service. Enemy submarine warfare was intensified in these areas commencing with the year 1942."

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BARROW, Clement, Oiler - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Canadian National Steamships -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: St. Michael's, Barbados, British West Indies.

"This seaman has served continuously during the war in submarine infested and dangerous waters. He has twice served on Canadian vessels which have been torpedoed and has been highly recommended by the chief Engineer as a good trustworthy servant, exceptionally faithful to his duties."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has recommendation dated 30 October 1945.

Mr Barrow has served with the company for over three years and nine months as fireman during the war period on the H.M.C.H.S. Lady Nelson and on the C.A.T. Lady Drake in submarine infested and dangerous waters.

Mr. Barrow has been torpedoed twice - on the Lady Nelson and Lady Drake. He has been highly recommended by the Chief Engineer of the Lady Nelson as a good and trustworthy servant and always faithful to his duties.

Mr. Barrow is presently a fireman on the H.M.C.H.S. Lady Nelson.

* * * * *

BARRY, L.C., Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian Pacific Steam 'Princess Kathleen' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943.

"For continuous devotion to duty while in command of his vessel which has been operating under dangerous and difficult conditions in the Mediterranean for the last two years." Gazetted as "For Valuable Service Under Trying Conditions in the Merchant Navy."

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BASTIEN, Gordon Love, Second Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - British Merchant Navy - Awarded as per London Gazette of 04 January 1943.

Born: Barry, Glamorgan, Wales on 30 March 1902. . Mr. Bastien first came to Canada in 1927 and then he served in the British Merchant Navy in WW2. He lived in Montreal after the war. Mr. Bastien was originally awarded the Albert Medal for Saving Life at Sea and had it converted to the George Cross in 1971.

The George Cross was presented by the Governor-General in Montreal in November 1973
BASTIEN. Gordon Love, 2nd(E) MN, British Merchant Marine. (MBE(Civil)~[4.1.43] 'SS BOWMAN' AM~[17.8.43]

BASTIEN, Gordon Love, Second Engineer Officer, MBE - Albert Medal (AM) - SS Bowman - Awarded as per London Gazette of 17 August 1943.

"The ship in which Mr. Bastien was serving was torpedoed and sustained severe damage. "Mr. Bastien was on watch in the engine-room when the ship (SS Bowman) was struck (500 miles off Brest on 30 March 1943). He at once shut off the engines. He then remembered that two firemen were on watch in the stokehold. The engine-room was in darkness and water was already pouring into it. Although there was grave risk of disastrous flooding in opening the watertight door between the stokehold and the engine-room, Mr. Bastien did not hesitate but groped his way to the door and opened it. The two firemen were swept into the engine-room with the inrush of water. One man had a broken arm and injured feet and the other was badly bruised and shaken. Mr. Bastien made efforts to hold them both but lost one, so he dragged the other to the escape ladder and helped him on deck. He then returned for the other and helped him to safety. The more seriously injured man had practically to be lifted up the ladder by Mr. Bastien, who was himself half choked by cordite fumes. Second Engineer Officer Bastien took a very great risk in opening the watertight door into the already flooded and darkened engine-room of the sinking ship and both men undoubtedly owe their lives to his exceptional bravery, strength and presence of mind."

Mr. Bastien was originally awarded the Albert Medal for Saving Life at Sea and had it converted to the George Cross in 1971. The George Cross was presented by the Governor-General in Montreal in November 1973. Mr. Bastien first came to Canada in 1927 and while he served in the British Merchant Navy, lived in Montreal after the war.

MEDALS of Second Engineer Gordon Love BASTIEN, GC, MBE:

GC - MBE (civil) - 39/45 Star - Atlantic Star - 39/45 War Medal - EIIR Coronation - EIIR Jubilee

Also awarded Lloyd's Medal for Bravery at Sea.

* * * * *

BERGSTROM, Eugene, Carpenter - British Empire Medal (BEM) - 'Anglo Canadian' - Awarded as per London Gazette of 3 June 1943 (no Canada Gazette). No citation.

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BERNA, Salvator Peter, Chief Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship 'Whitehall Park' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"Non-operational award: For long and arduous service, the war years having been spent in dangerous waters. Ex. HMS Conway cadet from 1932 to 1934. Joined S.S. Beaverdale on July 26th, 1934, as Cadet. Joined S.S. Beaverdale on April 13th, 1938 as 4th Officer. Joined S.S. Beaverdale on July 31st, 1940, as Third Officer, torpedoed on April 1st, 1941, and since then has frequently been under enemy attack in various war zones. Joined S.S. H.L. Alexander on May 22nd, 1941, as third Officer then transferred in August to S.S. Princess Marguerite as Chief Officer. First six months 1942 was spent in trooping in the Mediterranean. Returned to Canada in later part of Autumn of 1942 from fever contracted in East India. On loan to the Canadian National Steamships, joined the S.S. Colborne as Chief Officer on July 1st, 1943, then transferred to the C.A.T. Lady Rodney as First Officer in September and was promoted to Chief Officer in November. Standing by S.S. Whitehall Park in the United Shipyards on March 21st, 1944. Sat successfully for Master's Certificate on April 13th. He has served continuously on the Whitehall Park as Chief Officer to this date."

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BERNIER, Jean Baptiste, Chief Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Imperial Oil 'Laurendo' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"For continuous good service while operating in dangerous waters and remained in the service as Master until the loss of his ship by enemy action on January 1, 1943."

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BJARK, Peter Kromann, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - CN Steamship 'Asbjorn' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944.

"When Denmark was invaded by the Nazi, Captain Bjark was in Canadian waters. He persuaded his crew to remain with the ship and serve the Allies. He made many voyages to the United Kingdom, carrying munitions and supplies for Allied use. Spoken of as a 'worthy friend and ally'."

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BOLIVAR, Charles Sydney, Boatswain Mate - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - CN Steamship "Lady Hawkins" -

Awarded as per and London Gazette of 1 January 1943 (no Canada Gazette).

"Boatswain Mate of the Lady Hawkins torpedoed in the South Atlantic."

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BOWER, Danny, Fisherman - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Rescue crew of SS Gertrud Rask - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia. See also: Rodman Brannen (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Sydney Christie (BEM), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), Red Crowell (King's Commendation); Julius Purdy (King's Commendation) and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by the Naval Officer in Charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

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BRACKETT, John, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Halifax Pilotage District -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945.

Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia. Gazetted as "For Valuable Service Under Trying Conditions in the Merchant Navy."

"Navigating and beaching, in Halifax Harbour, of Munition ship on fire, November 3, 1943. The U.S.A. Merchant Ship VOLUNTEER loaded with cargo for overseas, amongst which were 4,058 boxes of small arms ammunition, 283 cartons of rubber, and 49 drums of magnesium powder, took fire on the morning of November 3rd. Two fire boats and a naval squad attempted to extinguish the flames, where the vessel lay in Bedford Basin. By noon, it was seen that the fire was gaining headway, and a call was sent out to the Pilotage Headquarters for someone to navigate the ship to McNab's Cove, where any possible explosion would not endanger the city and other shipping. John Brackett was on duty and proceeded out to the vessel where he found the Naval officers and ratings battling the conflagration with no help form the ship's crew. Mr. Brackett went on the bridge and took charge of the shifting boat. There was no steam up in any of the boilers nor in the windlass with the result that the anchor had to be slipped and marked with a buoy instead of being raised inboard. Even though the emergency might be justified in a layman's mind, cutting anchor fastenings and letting it sink, Pilot Brackett methodically and coolly and in exemplification of the best seamanship, disposed of the anchor in such a way as to insure its restoration to the ship when conditions would so permit. From then on, until 3 or 4 o'clock in the afternoon, Pilot Brackett remained on the bridge, and from that point conned the tugs which were used to tow the burning vessel to the beach. Arriving at McNab's Cove, the pilot still had the task to perform of placing the ship on shore in such a manner and location as to cause as little damage as possible and create favourable conditions for future salvage. This he performed to such perfection that, within an incredibly short period after the fire was extinguished, the craft was re-floated, reloaded and on its way overseas. When the task was completed, Mr. Brackett returned, unostentatiously, to his duties with the Pilotage Office. Pilot Brackett's action merits recognition from more than one angle of the consideration that is usually given to deeds recommended for awards. His courage was dramatically exemplified in his remaining through hours of potential danger of explosion, at his post of navigation and guide. His seamanship was demonstrated in laying the vessel in a position where no assured damage resulted and the possibility of future salvage was assured and this with few facilities and no assistance from the vessel's crew. His intelligent application of conservation of resources for war needs was shown in his disposal of the ship's anchor so that it could be recovered when again required. And his devotion to duty was exemplified in relieving the Naval party for concentrated attention to the fire. The Naval personnel engaged in extinguishing the blaze was variously recognized through decorations and mention in dispatches. The Pilot was never thought of, at the time, because, in the parlance of his calling, he had merely 'done another job'. In view of the above facts, it is, now strongly recommended that Pilot John Brackett be suitably recognized in the next award of Empire Awards or Honours, for his unsurpassed performance of arduous and dangerous duty in the face of extreme peril."

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BRACKETT, Wallace, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Halifax Pilotage District -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946.

Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"Long and faithful service, duties rendered especially arduous and dangerous during the six years of war (36 years of service). The Halifax Pilots, because of their position off the Port of Halifax, N.S., were continuously subjected to great risk during the war, the pilot's boat's position being, of course, some miles outside the Examination Vessel of the Royal Canadian Navy, and it is doubtful if there is any other port on the North Atlantic where great convoys moved in and out day and night under all kinds of weather conditions. The Pilots operated right alongside the dangerous mine fields; ships were sunk by submarine action right alongside the pilot boat as the pilots were carrying out their duties as pilots to the other ships; and the Pilot Boat Camperdown was severely shaken by depth charges during war action. Furthermore, pilots were over-carried from the port of Halifax to the New England States and the West Indies by ships when there was such high loss through enemy action in these special waters. It is quite logical reasoning to conclude if the crews of the ships which carried the pilots were subject to risk, so were the pilots. Pilots were also carried several hundred miles out to sea where they were taken off by warships of the Royal Canadian Navy. Again, it is logical to assume if such naval ships were liable to be organized or engaged in war action, it is not necessary to theorize on this point in consideration of the risk, the pilots who were aboard were subject to exactly the same condition. In addition, it is also pointed out that the pilot boat has, during the war, gone as far as 5 miles outside her station in dense fog and thick snow, etc., to board ships to obviate the risk of their being torpedoed."

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BRANNEN, Rodman, Fisherman - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Rescue crew of SS Gertrud Rask -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945.

Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia.

See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Sydney Christie (BEM), Fred Crowell (King's Commendation), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), Julius Purdy (King's Commendation) and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by the Naval Officer in Charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"Formed the crews of three small boats, which on the night of February 7th, 1942, went to the rescue of the crew of the Danish Government S.S. Gertrud Rask stranded on Banton Rocks during a violent storm. The Naval Officer from Shelburn, who came down to Baccaro to direct the rescue, speaks in glowing terms of the courage and seamanship displayed by this man and of the terrific personal physical risk taken by him in the matter."

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BRETON, Achillas, Boatswain - British Empire Medal (BEM) - DOT Marine Section 'Ernest Lapoint' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: St. Michel, Quebec.

"Long, efficient service. Has been with Ship Channel since 1910. This work has been complicated and made more arduous by reason of the war."

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BURNS, Frederick William, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Chomedy' - \

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946.

Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"For long, continued, faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea and in port during the war, two years of which were in submarine infested waters."

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BURTON, William, Carpenter - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Canadian National Steamship "Lady Hawkins"

-Awarded as per London Gazette of 1 January 1943 (no Canada Gazette).

Details of the Lady Hawkins being torpedoed by U-66 in the open Atlantic, East of Cape Hatteras, on 19 January 1942 can be found

in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 230. Recommendation was for a British Empire Medal.

"Carpenter of the Lady Hawkins torpedoed in the South Atlantic."

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CARON, Charles Antoine, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - DOT Marine Section 'N.B. McLean' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: L'Islet, Quebec.

"Has navigated Department of Transport vessels during the war and has rendered valuable service at Goose Bay, Newfoundland,

in connection with establishment of airports and in Hudson Bay. Has saved lives and property on several occasions by skilful rescue work."

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CHAN, For Sui, No. 1 Saloon Boy - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 13 January 1945.

This entry is found in the Canada Gazette with no other identifying information.

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 2, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a memo from Mr. Arthur Randles (Director of Merchant Seamen) to Mr. Robert Dorman (Secretary, Sub-Committee on Awards to Merchant Seaman, Department of Transport, Ottawa) dated 4 April 1944.

I am attaching hereto original letter I have received from Captain E. Aikman, Assistant to the Chairman, Canadian Pacific Steamships, bringing forward the case of Chinese seaman Chan For Sui, now serving on the SS Princess Kathleen. This seaman, in a period of over fifty years, has served about 33 years on Canadian Pacific vessels and his name might be brought forward for recognition in view of this long, meritorious service, as well as over two years continuous service in the Mediterranean area, during which time he experienced a torpedoing.

Supporting documentation indicates that Chan For Sui was a No.1 Saloon Boy, born October 1871 in a village near Canton. He has served on the Empress of China (1892-1900), Monteagle (1903-1910), Empress of Russia (1925-1941), Princess Marguerite (eight months in 1942, ship torpedoed and sunk, 17 August 1942) and Princess Kathleen (1942-44). This had included two years continuous service in the Mediterranean. It was noted that earlier in the war, when the Empress of Japan (later renamed Empress of Scotland) had been bombed, the British government had made an award to the Chinese Quartermaster who had displayed courage and coolness. Elsewhere in files it is noted that the Princess Marguerite was on passage from Port Said to Famagusta with 1,124 passengers. Although described as "abandoned successfully", 55 lives were lost.

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CHETWYND, Cecil, Fisherman - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Rescue crew of SS Gertrud Rask -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945.

Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia.

See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Rodman Brannen (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Sydney Christie (BEM), Fred Crowell (King's Commendation), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), Julius Purdy (King's Commendation) and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by Naval Officer in charge Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"Formed the crews of three small boats, which on the night of February 7th, 1942, went to the rescue of the crew of the Danish Government S.S. Gertrud Rask stranded on Banton Rocks during a violent storm. The Naval Officer from Shelburn, who came down to Baccaro to direct the rescue, speaks in glowing terms of the courage and seamanship displayed by this man and of the terrific personal physical risk taken by him in the matter."

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CHETWYND, Fred, Fishing Skipper - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Rescue of the crew 'Gertrud Rask' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945.

Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia.

See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Rodman Brannen (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Sydney Christie (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Fred Crowell (King's Commendation), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), Julius Purdy (King's Commendation) and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by Naval Officer in charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"On the night of February 7th, 1942, captained a crew of three who put out in a small boat in midst of a severe storm to rescue the crew of the Danish Government vessel, S.S. Gertrud Rask, stranded on the Banton Rocks. Various Canadian Government vessels had attempted to get near the wreck but without success on account of the terrific sea running. The Naval Officer in charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, reported exceptional courage and skill displayed by the fishermen generally and unusual ability in this man's handling of the small boat in the breakers. The rescue was successfully carried out by Fred Chetwynd's boat in conjunction with one other out of three which made the attempt.

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CHILDS, James William, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - CN Steamship 'Connector' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945.

Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"Non-operational duty award: For long, continued, faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea during this war. Long and arduous service on extremely difficult itineraries in waters where enemy submarines were operating. Captain Childs has been master of the Connector since June 9th, 1941, prior to which he served as Chief Officer and Relieving Master in other vessels of the Company. Since being made Master of the Connector, he has kept his vessel on the move without any undue delays."

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CHRISTIANSEN (not CHRISTIANSON), John, Carpenter - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Canadian National Steamships Lady Nelson - Awarded as per London Gazette of 14 June 1945 (no Canada Gazette).
NOTE: The London Gazette spelled his name incorrectly - it should be SEN not SON.
He was born in Denmark in 1890, and grew up in a naval family (his father was the captain of a merchant ship).
He immigrated to Canada in the late 20's or early 30's and married Marion Ross in the 30's in Kelwood, Manitoba where they owned a farm.
They had 6 children: Nelson, Dolly, Verna, Doreen, Randy, and Wendy.
He served on the Lady Nelson (the ship that was torpedoed in St. Lucia)
He also served on the Crescent Park, the Ashley Park, and the Lorne Park.
Medals: British Empire Medal, 1939-45 Star, the Italy Star, Atlantic Star, 1939-1945 War Medal (and eligible for the Canadian Volunteer Service Medal).
After returning from the war, he continued to work his farm in Kelwood, Manitoba until he retired in the early 1970's.
He died on 05 November 1973 in Kelwood, Manitoba.

"John Christianson is the Ship's Carpenter on a large merchant vessel (The Lady Nelson) which was torpedoed in the South Atlantic. Temporary repairs had to be effected at once and these were executed by Christianson. He displayed great courage and skill in helping to handle the disabled ship and assisting in bringing her to a United States port for repairs."

At 04.49 hours on 10 Mar, 1942, the German Submarine, U-161, fired two torpedoes into the harbour of Port Castries, St. Lucia. The first torpedo hit the Lady Nelson, which caught fire and sank by the stern in shallow waters. The second torpedo struck the Umtata, which sank by the stern. However, both vessels were later salvaged and repaired. The Umtata was sunk on 07 July 1942 by U-571

Three crew members and 15 passengers of the 116 crew members, 110 passengers and two gunners aboard Lady Nelson and seven dock workers were lost. On 16 April, the ship was salvaged, temporarily repaired and left for Mobile on 11 May. Later converted to a hospital ship for 518 patients and commissioned on 22 Apr, 1943.

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CHRISTIE, Earl, Fisherman - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Rescue crew of SS Gertrud Rask - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia. See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Rodman Brannen (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Sydney Christie (BEM), Fred Crowell (King's Commendation), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), Julius Purdy (King's Commendation) and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by the Naval Officer in Charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"Formed the crews of three small boats, which on the night of February 7th, 1942, went to the rescue of the crew of the Danish Government S.S. Gertrud Rask stranded on Banton Rocks during a violent storm. The Naval Officer from Shelburn, who came down to Baccaro to direct the rescue, speaks in glowing terms of the courage and seamanship displayed by this man and of the terrific personal physical risk taken by him in the matter."

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CHRISTIE, Sydney, Fishing Skipper - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Rescue of the crew 'Gertrud Rask' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia. See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Rodman Brannen (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Fred Crowell (King's Commendation), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), Julius Purdy (King's Commendation) and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by the Naval Officer in Charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"On the night of February 7th, 1942, captained a crew of three who put out in a small boat in midst of a severe storm to rescue the crew of the Danish Government vessel, S.S. Gertrud Rask, stranded on the Banton Rocks. Various Canadian Government vessels had attempted to get near the wreck but without success on account of the terrific sea running. The Naval Officer in charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia, reported exceptional courage and skill displayed by the fishermen generally and unusual ability in this man's handling of the small boat in the breakers. The rescue was successfully carried out by Sydney Christie's boat in conjunction with one other out of three which made the attempt.

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CLARKE, Victor Nathan, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - CN Steamship 'Liscomb Park' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"Non-operational award: Long continuing and faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea and in Port during the war, two years of which were in submarine infested waters."

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CLAYTON, Robert Carter, Wireless Officer - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - CN Steamship "Lady Hawkins" -

Awarded as per London Gazette of 1 January 1943 (no Canada Gazette).

Details of the Lady Hawkins being torpedoed by U-66 in the open Atlantic, East of Cape Hatteras, on 19 January 1942

can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 230.

"Wireless Officer of S.S. Lady Hawkins torpedoed in the South Atlantic."

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CLINTON, Daniel, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Vancouver Pilotage District - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Vancouver, British Columbia. Served with the Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for Vancouver Pilotage District.

"Long and efficient service, especially during the war years. Highly esteemed by both his fellow pilots and shipping circles."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a letter dated 8 April 1946 from C. Claxton, Superintendent of Pilots, Vancouver, to the Director of Marine Services, Department of Transport, Ottawa. The latter had written on 3 April, seeking recommendations for awards to Pilots.

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COATES, Eugene, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Interprovincial Steamship Lines Ltd. -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

"Long and skilful service as navigator with this one company, sixteen years, holder of Master's papers since 1917. Devotion to duty and continuous service in dangerous waters during the war."

* * * * *

COBHAM, Ronald Vernon, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - St. John Pilotage District -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Millidgeville, New Brunswick.

Served with the Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for St. John, New Brunswick, Pilotage District.

"Has piloted Naval vessels in and out of the Harbour of St. John, New Brunswick, and through the Falls to and from Indiantown, with absolute freedom from accidents, in spite of dangerous tides, foul weather and the submerged wreck of the S.S. Beaverhill, since shortly after the outbreak of war. Strongly recommended by Naval Authorities for excellent seamanship, judgment, devotion to duty and courtesy."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a letter dated 8 April 1946 from Mr. J.M.M. Lamb, Acting Superintendent of Pilots, Saint John, New Brunswick, to Mr. H.V. Anderson, Acting Director of Marine Services, Department of Transport, Ottawa.. The latter had written on 3 April 1946 to seek recommendations for pilotage awards.

In this connection I might say I have already forwarded a report and recommendation on behalf of Pilot Ronald Vernon Cobham, on November 6th last...You will note from said report that Pilot Cobham performed meritorious service in connection with pilotage of Naval craft during the war period and, in particular, piloted all Naval ships, which were numerous, to and from Indiantown, through the Reversing Falls, which was much more hazardous after the stranding of the Beaverhill. Mr. Cobham is one of the younger pilots, with fifteen years service, but his record during his period of service has been outstanding.

At the beginning of the war the services of Pilots Fenwick Murray McKelvey and Ronald Vernon Cobham were requested by the Naval Authorities to pilot all Naval ships entering the [and ?] leaving the port of Saint John and all movages in the harbour. Both performed their duties with competence and efficiency.

Pilot McKelvey has had a long and distinguished service over a period of 38 years, and I might say he piloted the largest Naval ship ever to enter Dry Dock here, the battleship Ramallies, both to and from the Dock, together with other large auxiliary cruisers.

Both Pilots Cobham and McKelvey piloted the Naval ships without mishap and both are deserving of recognition, particularly Pilot Cobham who has already been recommended by the Naval Authorities.

* * * * *

COLE, Richard Arnold, Chief Steward - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Lady Rodney' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"For long, continued, faithful and arduous duty while serving at sea during this war. Chief Steward of the C.A.T. Lady Rodney

which steamer has been steadily engaged since June, 1942, in the transport of troops between Canada and Goose Bay, Labrador,

as well as between Halifax and St. John, Newfoundland, during which time there have been several close brushes with enemy submarines."

* * * * *

CREASER, Douglas Lealand, Second Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - CN Steamship Colborne -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Rosebay, Luneburg County, Nova Scotia. See also Douglas Gordon Dauphinee.

"Together with Mr. D.G. Dauphinee, Third Officer, manned and fired the two machine guns in the
bridgenests, against two formation of Japanese aircraft which rained bombs around the ship, destroying the
lighters. The Colborne sustained fifty holes from shell fragments and was making water in No. 3 Hold."

The S.S. Colborne (Canadian National Steamships was attacked by Japanese aircraft, on 11 December 1944,
at anchor in Penang. She was holed 50 times but got away with a valuable rubber cargo.

* * * * *

CROWELL, Fred, Fisherman - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Rescue crew of SS Gertrud Rask -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945.

Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia.

See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Rodman Brannan (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Sydney Christie (BEM), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), Julius Purdy (King's Commendation) and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by the Naval Officer in Charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"Formed the crews of three small boats, which on the night of February 7th, 1942, went to the rescue of the crew of the Danish Government S.S. Gertrud Rask stranded on Banton Rocks during a violent storm. The Naval Officer from Shelburn, who came down to Baccaro to direct the rescue, speaks in glowing terms of the courage and seamanship displayed by this man and of the terrific personal physical risk taken by him in the matter."

* * * * *

DAUPHINEE, Douglas Gordon, Third Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - CN Steamship 'Colborne' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia. See also Douglas Zealand Creaser.

"Together with Mr. D.Z. Creaser, Second Officer, manned and fired the two machine guns in the bridge nests, against two formation of Japanese aircraft which rained bombs around the ship, destroying the lighters. The Colborne sustained fifty holes from shell fragments and was making water in No. 3 Hold."

The S.S. Colborne (Canadian National Steamships was attacked by Japanese aircraft, on 11 December 1944, at anchor in Penang. She was holed 50 times but got away with a valuable rubber cargo."

* * * * *

DAVIES, Edward Alfred, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Imperial Oil 'Arlington Beach Park' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"Non-operational award for meritorious, long and faithful service, during whole period of war, operating in dangerous waters with highly explosive cargoes."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 2, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a letter from H.J. Rahlves (Marine Department, Imperial Oil) to Mr. Arthur Randles, Director of Merchant Seamen, Department of Transport, dated 11 September 1944, which states:

Captain Edward Alfred Davies - has been Master of the SS Sarnolite and the SS Arlington Beach Park for the full period of hostilities, serving in the former vessel as Master until January 23rd, 1944 when he was transferred to the latter unit. While he was Master of the SS Sarnolite, this vessel was operating in the Halifax/Newfoundland/Labrador service, and although we have no knowledge of any action which he may have encountered, there is no doubt that enemy action was met with while on that service. He has been Master of the SS Arlington Beach since February 1944, and while on this vessel, he is operating in the Western Atlantic service. Captain Davies has been an employee of this company since January 1926.

* * * * *

DECKER, George Alvin, Cadet - British Empire Medal (BEM) - 'Empire Guidion' -

Awarded as per London Gazette of 12 April 1943 (no Canada Gazette). Served on the Empire Guidion from Cardiff Wales.

"For courage, initiative and leadership."

* * * * *

DELOUCHRY, Emmett, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Halifax Pilotage District -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Served with the Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for Halifax Pilotage District.

"Long and faithful efficient service, duties rendered especially arduous and dangerous during the six years of war (27 years service). The Halifax Pilots, because of their position off the Port of Halifax, N.S., were continuously subjected to great risk during the war, the pilot's boat's position being, of course, some miles outside the Examination Vessel of the Royal Canadian Navy, and it is doubtful if there is any other port on the North Atlantic where great convoys moved in and out day and night under all kinds of weather conditions. The Pilots operated right alongside the dangerous mine fields; ships were sunk by submarine action right alongside the pilot boat as the pilots were carrying out their duties as pilots to the other ships; and the Pilot Boat Camperdown was severely shaken by depth charges during war action. Furthermore, pilots were over-carried from the port of Halifax to the New England States and the West Indies by ships when there was such high loss through enemy action in these special waters. It is quite logical reasoning to conclude if the crews of the ships which carried the pilots were subject to risk, so were the pilots. Pilots were also carried several hundred miles out to sea where they were taken off by warships of the Royal Canadian Navy. Again, it is logical to assume if such naval ships were liable to be organized or engaged in war action, it is not necessary to theorize on this point in consideration of the risk, the pilots who were aboard were subject to exactly the same condition. In addition, it is also pointed out that the pilot boat has, during the war, gone as far as 5 miles outside her station in dense fog and thick snow, etc., to board ships to obviate the risk of their being torpedoed."

* * * * *

DeWOLFE, Thomas Matthew, Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Meritorious Service -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: Ship Harbour, Nova Scotia.

"Long, meritorious service during war emergency."

* * * * *

DICKS, Louis Herbert, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Halifax -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"For devotion to duty while Master of a Canadian Merchant vessel, for a long period operating in dangerous waters. In particular for rescuing on two occasions, the crews of torpedoed vessels, numbering 26 and 54 seamen respectively and for towing to safety another distressed Canadian ship."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 1, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a letter dated 19 October 1943 from Mr. W.C. Duncan, President, Saguenay Terminals Limited, to Commander C.P. Edwards, Deputy Minister of Transport, Ottawa, calling attention to this mariner who is described thus:

Captain Dicks has commanded vessels owned or chartered by us and, from the end of 1940 until March 1943, was constantly at sea in out trade between British Guiana, the West Indies and Canada.

In particular he was, between March 1942 and March 1943 (when he was taken seriously ill with pneumonia) master of our Canadian M.V. Turret Cape trading between B.G., Trinidad and the U.S. at a period when the sinkings in that area by enemy action reached their highest levels. Captain Dicks had the distinction of being instrumental in saving the lives of the crews of two vessels and of towing in one disabled vessel. The dates are given hereunder:

May 3rd, 1942, 2.00 p.m. Picked up 26 survivors of the Brazilian SS Parahyba which had been torpedoes May 1st. Landed these survivors at Georgetown 4th May. Submarine was reported sighted in vicinity during the rescue.

Sept.8th, 1942, 11.00 a.m. to 3.15 p.m. Picked up 54 survivors from SS Alcoa Mariner after inspection of the vessel torpedoed that day at 5.45 a.m. Landed all survivors at Georgetown 30th September 1942.

Nov.19th, 1942, 9.35 a.m. Picked up the SS Hamildoc which was in distress with engines broken down. Vessel towed to the Serpent's Mouth (167 miles) and anchored it safely. Both vessels arrived off Port of Spain, Nov.21st, 2.30 p.m.

Captain Dicks kept the MV Turret Cape running efficiently during the most critical period in the Caribbean area and was thus instrumental in helping to tide over an anxious time to all industries dependent at that time for their raw materials.

* * * * *

DOLBEL, Earle Gavey, Fourth Officer (Prisoner of War) - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Marlag and Milag Nord Camps / Imperial Oil Company -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946.

Home: Verdun, Quebec. Commended by Director General of War Transport, London, England and by Deputy Minister of Transport.

"Voluntary services rendered fellow prisoners at Marlag and Milag Nord prison camps in Germany."

* * * * *

DOUCETTE, Joseph Law, Oiler - British Empire Medal (BEM) - DOT 'C.G.S. Dollard' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1945. Home: Comeau Hill, Nova Scotia.

Service 28 years, steady, and efficient. His service during the war years has been consistently in keeping with the traditions of British Marine Records and in every way deserving of recognition."

* * * * *

EDWARDS, John Allan, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship Alder Park -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born 4 October 1910.

Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Served as Third Officer in the Empress of Scotland from outbreak of war to November 1943.

Appointed First Officer in S.S. Gatineau Park from 16 November 1943 to 1 July 1944. Then appointed as Master in the S.S. Alder Park until October 1945.

"Third Officer on Empress of Scotland at outbreak of war, and continued in this capacity, with a short spell as Troop Deck Officer in the same vessel, up to November 15, 1945, during which period Empress of Scotland was engaged in Admiralty Service under requisition to the British Ministry of War Transport, transporting troops to the war zone. On November 9th, 1940, Empress of Scotland was bombed by enemy aircraft in the Atlantic, and although not getting a direct hit, there were some very near misses. The ship was damaged on deck by machine gun bullets, and one bomb hit the after rail and carried it away. The Master of Empress of Scotland, Captain J.W. Thomas, commented very favourably on the conduct of his crew, and referred particularly to the magnificent work performed by Mr. Edwards, who was a Gunnery Officer. Appointed as First Officer, S.S. Gatineau Park 16 November 1943, and continued in that vessel until July 1st, 1944, when he was appointed Master of the S.S. Alder Park, and has served in this vessel as Master until preceding on leave October 4th. While in command, he has made two rounds from Canadian Ports to India, and has at all times managed his vessel in convoy work with distinction."

* * * * *

FINLAY, Patrick G., Chief Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship Lady Rodney -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born 26 September 1909 at Plymouth, England. Home: Thedford, Ontario.

Chief Officer of G.A.T. Lady Rodney which has steadily been engaged since 1942, carrying troops between Canada and various war centres.

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has recommendation dated 22 October 1945.

Continuously employed at sea for full duration of war, trading in submarine infested and dangerous waters as Second and Chief Officer. Promoted to Master, July 5, 1945.

* * * * *

FOURNIER, Joseph Etionne, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Imperial Oil 'Point Peelee Park' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Cap St. Ignace, Quebec. Master of the Imperial Oil Co. vessel Point Peelee Park.

"Non-operational award for meritorious, long and faithful service, during whole period of war, operating in dangerous waters with highly explosive cargoes."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 2, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a letter from H.J. Rahlves (Marine Department, Imperial Oil) to Mr. Arthur Randles, Director of Merchant Seamen, Department of Transport, dated 11 September 1944, which states:

Captain Joseph Etienne Dollard Fournier - served in vessels of Imperial Oil Limited and Park Steamship Limited for the full war period. During this time he has acted in the capacity of Deck Officer and Master of vessels operating in the Western Atlantic, and also at the opening of hostilities in the overseas service. During part of this time he served as Chief Officer on the SS Trontolite carrying highly inflammable products such as Casinghead and Aviation gasolines. He joined the SS Point Peelee Park as Master in July 1943, and is still serving in that capacity. Captain Fournier has been an employee of this company since May 1932.

* * * * *

FREEMAN, Claude, Able Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - CN Steamship 'Cornwallis' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943.

Details of the Cornwallis being torpedoed by U-514 off Barbados, on 11 September 1942 (and surviving) can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 240.

The Cornwallis was sunk on 3 December 1944 by U-1230 with the loss of all hands.

"For devotion to duty as Able Seaman when his ship was torpedoed by disguised submarines. Freeman was one of six of ship's company who volunteered to remain on board to look after the ship in spite of danger of anther torpedo, the remainder of the crew being ordered to the boats. He, with the others, worked through most of the first night caring for matters of urgency as the ship was making water and it was not known whether she would stay afloat. Freeman stayed with the ship during the towing from Barbados to Mobile, Alabama, for repairs. All the machinery was out of order and the ship was a "dead" tow."

* * * * *

GATES, Harold, Boatswain - British Empire Medal (BEM) - CN Steamship 'Cornwallis' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"Stayed with the ship when torpedoed in West Indian waters. Boatswain Harold Gates was one of six crewmen (exclusive of the gunners) who volunteered to stay with the vessel, in spite of danger of another torpedo and doubts as to whether the Cornwallis would even stay afloat. Gates had worked through the night to stabilize flooding and then stayed as she was towed 'dead' to Mobile, Alabama."

Details of the Cornwallis being torpedoed by U-514 off Barbados, on 11 September 1942 (and survived) can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 240.

* * * * *

GIRARD, Laurent, Able Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Elder Line 'Point Pleasant Park' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Pointe Au Pic, Quebec.

"Badly injured in torpedoing of S.S. Point Pleasant Park. Suffered extremely with unusual patience and courage, through wet and cold weather in open boat for nine days."

Details of S.S. Point Pleasant Park being torpedoed by U-510 in the South Atlantic, NW of Cape Town, South Africa on 23 February 1945 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 241.

* * * * *

GRAHAM, Ronald Jordon, Able Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - 'Ocean Voice' -

Awarded as per London Gazette of 1 January 1943 (no Canada Gazette).

"For exceptionally fine work in extricating passengers when ship torpedoed and abandoned."

* * * * *

GRIFFITH, Edwin, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - CN Steamship 'Cornwallis' -

Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

For outstanding service and devotion to duty while Chief Engineer on two different Canadian vessels, one of which was heavily bombed, the other was torpedoed, but owing to this Officer's effective service, the latter vessel was brought safely to port after emergency repairs were made."

Details of the Cornwallis being torpedoed by U-514 off Barbados, on 11 September 1942 (and survived) can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 240. The Cornwallis was sunk on 3 December 1944 by U-1230 with the loss of all hands.

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations", in National Archives of Canada, Record Group 12, Volume 1106, has recommendation passed from the General Manager, Canadian National Steamships to Deputy Minister of Transport, Ottawa, 27 October 1943. This identifies him as having been Chief Engineer of the Colborne. The form gives his date of birth (7 March 1883, Carnarvon, Wales) and states that he entered company service on 8 April 1921. It reads as follows:

Recommended For: Operational award, given for brave conduct in the face of the enemy.

Place of Attack: Lying at anchor off the wharf at Penang, loading rubber, lighters being tied up alongside.

Date of Attack: December 11th, 1941.

Nature of Attack: Bombing of Penang by three waves of Japanese bombers.

Details: For outstanding work and devotion to duty in having everything in readiness for getting ship under way and out of Penang during severe bombing of harbour by Japanese aircraft. During the raids ship sustained fifty holes from shell fragments and was making water in No.3 Hold. Mr. Griffith kept the water pumped out of Starboard No.3 Bilge until such time as ship given port list through his efforts sufficient to bring the leak out and above water and control the flow.

The same file has details of torpedo attack on Cornwallis (see H.H. Jenkins). Of Griffith's role it states:

Mr. Edwin Griffith was sent to Barbados after the torpedoing to complete temporary repairs, and was Chief Engineer aboard when ship was towed from Barbados to Mobile, Alabama for permanent repairs. All machinery being out of order, the ship was a "dead" tow.

* * * * *

GUY, Clayton Lewis, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Dominion Shipping Co. Ltd. - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: North Sydney, Nova Scotia.

"Long and arduous service on the North Atlantic, in dangerous waters, has acted as Commodore in war convoys more than twenty times. Eminently meritorious service."

* * * * *

HENDRY, Alexander, Chief Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - CN Steamship 'Colborne' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944 (recommended on 10 April 1944). Home: Quebec City, Quebec.

"Went around the ship after Japanese planes first came in sight, and ordered crew to take cover. Later cast off lines of lighters tied up at No.2, then went with carpenter to forecastle head to heave up anchor, which succeeded in doing on intervals although the other two flights came over and bombs simply rained about the ship. The raising of the anchor thus assisted in enabling ship to clear the harbour. This contributed to saving of ship and cargo, although vessel sustained fifty holes from shell fragments and was making water in No. 3 hold."

The S.S. Colborne (Canadian National Steamships was attacked by Japanese aircraft, on 11 December 1944, at anchor in Penang. She was holed 50 times but got away with a valuable rubber cargo."

* * * * *

HOCKING, Norman Penrose, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - CN Steamship 'Mount Robson Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Vancouver, B.C. Mentioned in Despatches three times, 1914-1918. Also held Victory and Allied Medals, 1914-1919 plus South African Transport Medals.

"In charge of S.S. Mount Robson Park since August 1942, and has navigated with skill in Australian and South Atlantic enemy waters."

* * * * *

HUBLEY, J.H., Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Montreal # - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943.

"Meritorious work in the Merchant Navy."

* * * * *

HUNT, Percival Herbert, Chief Officer - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - M.V. Canadian Star - Awarded as per London Gazette of 1 January 1942 (no Canada Gazette).

* * * * *

HUNTER, Walter Henry, Chief Radio Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born 29 August 1895; home in Tusket, Nova Scotia.

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has recommendation dated 22 October 1945. Identified as a Radio Officer.

Continuously employed at sea for full duration of war, trading in submarine infested and dangerous waters.

There is a longer text in the same file which reads:

Mr. Hunter is presently Chief Radio Officer, SS Colborne. Mr. Hunter has been continuously employed without vacation during the entire war period in submarine infested and dangerous waters. He was responsible for the coding and decoding of all messages sent and received at sea essential to the safe navigation of his vessel. Recommended for service and continuous duty.

* * * * *

ISNOR, Oswald, Chief Diver(Posthumous) - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Foundation Maritime Ltd Halifax -Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 31 July 1943.

"When endeavouring to salvage a very valuable cargo"

* * * * *

 

 

JAMES, Somer Oscar, Ordinary Seaman- British Empire Medal (BEM) - 'Empire Lighting' - Awarded as per London Gazette of 23 January 1945 (no Canada Gazette). JAMES, Somer Oscar, Ordinary Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - 'Empire Lighting' (Hall Brothers)

- Awarded as per London Gazette of 23 January 1945 (no Canada Gazette).

Somer James Medals

Born in Toronto in 1921. Put himself into the various manning pools in England and Canada so that he could select the ships and the routes. Married Jean Smith (former Womanise' Auxiliary Air Force - WAAF) in Britain in September 1945; she flew to Canada in December 1945.

Moved to Winnipeg after the war; operated several small businesses. He has four children: Heather, David (living in New Zealand), Wendy, and Keith plus eight grandchildren. He died on 17 January 2004 in Winnipeg.
He was formally invested with the BEM in Ottawa by the Governor General in February of 1946. He is one of three Canadians awarded the Lloyds Medal during WW2 and this was received by mail.

Service as follows:

S.S. Telemaches 15 July 1941 to 12 August 1941
(Itheca, Israel, Montreal to Swansea, Wales)

S.S. Mathilda 15 August 1941 to 20 April 1942
(Bergen, Norway to Cardiff; New York to Newcastle toMobile, USA) (returned to Liverpool)

M.V. Delhi 02 May 1942 to 18 July 1942
(Oslo, Norway to Liverpool to Philadelphia, USA to Bristol, England)

S.S. Ingerfire 28 October 1942 to 23 March 1943
(Cardiff, Wales to Bone, Algiers)

This ship was damaged by a torpedo north of Cuba in November 1942 and returned to Manchester in March, 1943
after repairs had been made in Mobile, Albabama

S.S. Manchester Commerce 04 June 1943 to 02 August 1943
(Great Britain)

S.S. Empire Lightening 14 September 1943 to 26 March 1944
(Great Britain to Montevideo and Buenos Aires and back) (London to Torre Aningiatria (near Naples) Italy to London

M.V. Sovac (Oil Tanker) 17 April 1944 to 06 June 1944
(Goteberg, Sweden to Cardiff to Philadelphia to Bristol Channel Oil Refinery)

S.S. Larnaston

S.S. Rockwood Park 04 November 1944 to 15 March 1945
(St. John Newfoundland to Georgetown, British Guyana to New York) two trips

S.S. Bellwoods Park 05 May 1945 to 29 May 1945
(Montreal, Canada)

S.S. Lakeview Park 04 June 1945 to 21 July 1945
(St. John, New Brunswick to Manchester, England)

S.S. Hampstead Park (21 August 1945 to 19 October 1945
(Montreal to London)

The incident occurred on 5 November 1943 and recommendation was made by Captain Burge, S.S. Empire Lightening.

"The ship, loaded with high explosive, was moored at an Italian port when an enemy aircraft attack developed. There was a number of drums of octaine spirit stacked on the quay with a big ammunition dump only one-and-a-half ship’s lengths astern.

A bomb fell on the dump which immediately took fire. A series of heavy explosions followed and caused considerable superficial damage to the ship. Two landing barges nearby also caught fire. In these circumstances the vessel was moved ahead along

the wharf and singled up ready for slipping in case it became necessary to move her still further away. Ordinary Seaman James showed outstanding courage throughout. When the ship had to be moved, it was necessary for someone to go on to the quay and let go the moorings.

In spite of the grave risks, James volunteered for this task. After this work had been accomplished he assisted in moving a number of burning barges, some of which were loaded with dangerous goods. There is no doubt that his action did much towards saving the ship from more serious damage."

JAMES, Somer Oscar, Ordinary Seaman - Lloyds War Medal for Bravery at Sea’. (Empire Lighting' (Hall Brothers) - Awarded as per memo of 24 October 1945 from Committee Roo, Lloyd’s London, E.C.3 to Mr. S.O. James of 38 Wood Road, Mancheste, 16.

The Lloyd’s War Medal for Bravery at Sea "is bestowed upon Officers and men of the Merchant Navy and Fishing Fleets in cases of exceptional gallantry at sea in time of war. The medal, has on the obverse the heroic figure symbolising courage and endurance and the trident sea power.

The oak leaves and acorns fittingly suggest those qualities of sturdiness and endurance which are present in our seamen who serve the ships of steel as ever they were in their predecessors who manned the ‘Wooden Walls of old England." The ribbon of the medal is in blue and silver.

Medals include: BEM (Civil); 1939/45 Star; Atlantic Star; Africa Star with bar North Africa; CVSM and Clasp (awarded in 1994); 1939/1945 War Medal and the Lloyds War Medal for Bravery at Sea. They are on display at the Canadian War Museum.

His Obituary by Ayah McKHAIL, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, May 4, 2005, Page S7 Toronto reads:

Somer James, Canadian pacifist who chose to join the merchant navy rather than take up arms during the Second World War won an unprecedented brace of civilian bravery medals

He was an ordinary Canadian seaman who accomplished an extraordinary feat. On November 5, 1943, Somer JAMES won two medals for bravery for singlehandedly saving his ship.

The sun was just rising over Torre Aningiatria, a port southeast of Naples, when German bombers descended on allied shipping. The port was of strategic importance because the Allies could unload the massive quantities of supplies they needed to drive the Germans out of Italy; Mr. JAMES's ship offered choice prey. Loaded with ammunition, The Empire Lightening was moored to a dock piled with high-octane fuel when the bombs began to find their targets. One struck the fuel, setting it ablaze and threatening both the Lightening and other freighters moored fore and aft. The ship could be saved only by a careful combination of dropping some of its lines and doubling others, so it could be manoeuvred away from the fire.

The captain called for volunteers. Amidst the pandemonium, only Mr. JAMES, who was not yet 22, stepped up. He donned a heavy jacket and lifebelt and went on deck alone. With the captain shouting instructions down at him from the bridge, with fire raging alongside and with high explosives beneath his feet, he ran the length of the ship from one mooring point to another and did his best to handle the massive hemp lines alone. The entire operation lasted about three hours, but, in the end, he managed to get the ship out of harm's way, its sides scorched by fire.

Yet, he didn't stop at that. Once the Lightening was secured, he helped move a number of barges loaded with dangerous cargo that had also caught fire.

The action later won him both the British Empire Medal and the Lloyd's Medal for Bravery, an unusual double honour. While 29 other Canadian merchant sailors won the British Empire Medal for bravery during the Second World War, and some won the Lloyd's medal, none received both awards for the same event.

A soft-spoken pacifist with sparkling blue eyes, he was an academic at heart. Largely self-taught, he completed only Grade 11 at Toronto's Harbord Collegiate, yet was deeply intellectual and visited the library often. When war broke out, he had been adamantly opposed to armed conflict and couldn't bear the thought of pulling a trigger on anyone. Instead, in 1940, this pensive Jewish teenager from Toronto took a train ride to Montreal to see whether he could join the merchant navy. It would determine his fate for the next five years. He found a Greek steamer, the first of 12 ships he would serve aboard in the Battle of the Atlantic. It was the war's longest theatre of war and the costliest. One in seven people died in the line of duty, their ships and their valuable cargo sent to the bottom by German U-boats and surface raiders and sometimes because of collision while in convoy. Of the 12,000 Canadians who served, more than 1,600 lost their lives.

For all its dangers, the job suited Mr. JAMES. "It saved me from certain actions," he once said. "I didn't want to get involved with killing people, shooting them with guns from far away, and getting involved with anything like that."

Contrary to belief, merchant sailors didn't do it for the money. In 1940, the year Mr. JAMES joined, the average monthly pay rate for a seaman in the merchant navy was $55, compared with $123 for a sailor in the Royal Canadian Navy. Until later in the war, a merchant seaman who was forced to abandon ship even had his pay stopped.

In August of 1945, Mr. JAMES made one final voyage across the Atlantic. In 1943, he had met a young English woman while waiting for a train at Denham station in London; a romance soon developed. They married on September 18, 1945, at St. John's Wood synagogue in London and decided to settle in Canada. They lived in Toronto until August of 1946, then headed for Winnipeg to a job at the Winnipeg Film Exchange.
Later, Mr. JAMES became a partner in a theatre-poster business and then opened the Regency Coin and Stamp Company, which he operated until his retirement in 1998. Over the years, he wrote several books on coins, stamps and tokens, a fascination that had started during his years in the merchant navy when he always seemed to have a pocketful of interesting foreign coins. He served on the board of several non-profit organizations in Winnipeg and was made a life member of the Canadian Numismatic Association.

Mr. JAMES spoke little about his war service and thought less about his two medals until they were sought by the new Canadian War Museum in Ottawa. They go on display when the museum opens this weekend.

Somer JAMES was born in Toronto on December 24, 1921. He died of Parkinson's disease on January 17, 2005. He was 83. He leaves his wife, Jean; daughters Heather and Wendy; sons David and Keith; and sisters Beula and Esther.

* * * * *

JENKINS, David I., Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - McLean-Kennedy Ltd 'Banff Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Cardiff, Wales. Died at sea on 14 December 1945.

"Devotion to duty during service in dangerous waters, Pacific and Atlantic. Highly recommended by his employers."

Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has letter dated 17 October 1945 from McLean Kennedy Limited (Steamship Managers, Brokers and Agents) to Mr. Arthur Randles, Director of Merchant Seamen, Department of Transport, Ottawa. This recommends Captain Hill Wilson of SS Outremont Park for an award (apparently not granted) as well as Captain D.I. Jenkins of SS Banff Park. Of Jenkins it reads:

Captain D.I. Jenkins has served in command of British and Canadian steamers since the outbreak of war in 1939. He came to Canada in 1942 to take command of the SS Banff Park, one of the first vessels to be built for the Park Steamship Company at the Quebec Shipyards. He served on this vessel continuously on the Indian trade from 1942 until June 1945. During the whole of this period Captain Jenkins has proved himself very devoted to his duty and has maintained an efficient operation of the vessel under his command under extremely trying conditions in waters made hazardous by enemy action.

* * * * *

JENKINS, Henry Hubert, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship Cornwallis - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Details of the Cornwallis being torpedoed by U-514 off Barbados, on 11 September 1942 (and surviving) can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 240. The Cornwallis was sunk on 3 December 1944 by U-1230 with the loss of all hands.

For exceptional devotion to duty as Chief Engineer when his vessel was torpedoed and he performed valuable salvage duties until relieved.

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations", in National Archives of Canada, Record Group 12, Volume 1106, has recommendation passed from the General Manager, Canadian National Steamships to Deputy Minister of Transport, Ottawa, 27 October 1943. This confirms as being Chief Engineer aboard the Cornwallis. The form gives his date of birth (13 October 1897 at Bergoed, Cardiff, Wales) and states that he entered company service on 11 May 1926. It reads as follows:

Recommended For: Operational award: for brave conduct in the face of the enemy.

Place of Attack: Lying at anchor in the harbour at Bridgetown, Barbados.

Date of Attack: September 11th, 1942 (late afternoon).

Nature of Attack: Torpedo attack by disguised enemy submarine on Harbour Defence Obstruction. The earlier torpedoes damaged the net, leaving the Cornwallis open to attack. Six torpedoes were fire in fifty minutes, the sixth one striking the Cornwallis amidships on the starboard side. There was a huge column of water, oil and smoke thrown out of No.3 hatch and funnel, and the ship instantly listed to starboard and settled in the water, but righted as soon as rush of water into the ship levelled to the sea.

Details: Immediately after the first torpedo explosion on harbour defence obstruction, was ordered by the Master to get steam on main engines for steaming towards the beach, and when ship was hit, was in the E/R top. He had one boiler Donkey and two with handy steam. There was an explosion and a roar of steam simultaneously, carrying with it steam and oil, up through the skylights. His first thoughts were of fire, and he went down into the 'tween alleyway and along to Fidley. Here he shut off fuel unit and opened smothering steam, ten went back along into E/R and shut watertight door. By this time water level was at cylinder tops. As no more could be done below, went on deck and reported to the Master. From then on, assisted the Master in any way possible. Was one of six of the ship's own company (exclusive of gunners) who of their own free will volunteered to remain on board after the torpedoing to look after the ship, in spite of danger of another torpedo, the remainder being ordered to the boats with the exception of two others whose services were required aboard. Mr. Jenkins was included amongst those who worked through the best part of the first night caring for matters of urgency arising out of the disaster, as the ship was making water, and it was not known at first whether she would continue to remain afloat. During he whole of the subsequent operations, the Chief Engineer and his juniors assisted in everything, rigging tackles, handling lines and cables. After receiving the pump from shore, he looked after the pumping night and day, and with the Chief Engineer, had it transferred from one hold to the other as was found necessary. The water had to be kept down in Nos.1, 3 and 4 Holds. Cargo was removed from bulkhead in No.3 Hold to get at open rivet holes through which water was getting into the Hold from the Engine Room. After plugging seven holes, there was not further increase of water in No.3 Hold. On account of the danger of No.1 Hold filling up through bilge suction pipe from Engine Room, close watch was kept on it until cargo was discharged.

* * * * *

JENSEN, Johannes Jergen Zingler, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian Govt Merchant 'Asbjorn' - Awarded as per London Gazette of 1 January 1945 (no Canada Gazette). Born 4 April 1894 in Copenhagen.

"Non-operational Award: For long, continuous faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea and in port during this war, while in service between Canada and the United Kingdom in enemy submarine infested waters. From the time that this motor ship was turned over to this company for operation in May, 1940, to the present date, Mr. Jensen's interests have been entirely devoted to maintaining the mechanical equipment under his charge in such condition that the vessel has made nineteen successful crossing of the North Atlantic from Canada and the United States to the United Kingdom during which time he has been faced with many crew difficulties and crew shortages which he has successfully coped with, diplomatically dealing with a mixed Canadian, British and Danish Engine room crew with no delays to vessel on account of mechanical failures, even during times when vessel encountered enemy action."

* * * * *

JOHNSTON, J. Arnold, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship Company - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born 7 June 1914 in Nassau. Home: Nassau, Bahamas, B.W.I.

"This officer has served at sea on Canadian merchant vessels in dangerous waters continuously since the outbreak of war. His name has been brought to notice for long and continuous service and devotion to duty under exceptionally trying conditions."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has recommendation dated 22 October 1945.

Continuously employed at sea for full duration of war, trading in submarine invested and dangerous waters as Third, Second and Chief Engineer. Promoted to Chief Engineer, March 21, 1942.

* * * * *

JOHNSTON, Leonard H., First Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship 'Empress of Asia' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944
and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Vancouver, British Columbia.
Details of the Empress of Asia being bombed by Japanese aircraft, off Singapore on 5 February 1942 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 231.
He is the brother -in-law of Commodore J.T. York.
In 1942, surviving the sinking of the Empress of Asia, he successfully led a party of 40 other survivors in eluding the Japanese and to safety in Australia.
For this exploit, he was awarded the MBE. As Master of the S.S. Gatineau Park, he made five convoy crossing in 1942 / 1943.
From 1943 until the wars end, he was the Master of the SS. Princess Kathleen, an armed troop transport in the Mediterranean Sea.
Among his fellow seafarers was H.R.H. Prince Phillip.
At the end of the war, he returned to C.P. Steamships and when he retired in 1965, he was Commodore of the Fleet and Captain of the Empress of Canada.

"For devotion to duty in assisting in the defense of his ship when attacked and set afire by enemy dive-bombers. After assisting the successful abandonment of the ship,
he helped to navigate a small coastal vessel without proper charts and without adequate supply of provisions and fuel oil. This ship had to be abandoned when attacked by enemy units
and parachute troops and the crew taken overland to safety."

Medals of First Officer Leonard JOHNSTON, OBE, Canadian Pacific Steamship Company:

MBE (civil 2nd type) - 39/45 Star - Atlantic Star - Africa Star - Burma Star -
Italy Star - 39/45 War Medal (now entitled to CVSM with Clasp)

 

* * * * *

JONES, Harry, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Maple Towing Company Tug R.F.M. - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Vancouver, B.C.

"Captain Jones just arrived in Vancouver Harbour with Tug R.F.M. at the time of the first explosion of the Greenhill Park. He immediately abandoned this tow and rushed his Tug alongside the Greenhill Park and assisted in removing the vessel beyond the area where she might cause damage to life and property of the city. His courage and good seamanship of highest order exemplified in acting in the emergency not knowing what cargo the burning vessel might hold. Whole crew highly commended but medal strongly urged for the skipper."

* * * * *

KELLY, Percy A., Chief Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - CN Steamship 'Lady Hawkins' - Awarded as per London Gazette of 1 January 1943 (no Canada Gazette). Details of the Lady Hawkins being torpedoed by U-66 in the open Atlantic, East of Cape Hatteras, on 19 January 1942 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 230.

"Chief Officer of the Lady Hawkins torpedoed in the South Atlantic. Chief Officer (now Captain) Kelly allowed his own boat to get away and remained on board trying to launch the other boats until just before the ship sank. He then swan to his boat, which contained seventy-six survivors, and took charge. During part of the four days they were at sea and the weather was heavy, and to steer an overcrowded boat with an oar, for the rudder was lost, required skilful seamanship. The Chief Officer showed outstanding powers of command and his fine example gave confidence to his shipmates."

* * * * *

KERR, Robert John, Purser - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Lady Rodney' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"Non-operational award: For long, continued, faithful, arduous duty whilst serving at sea and in port during the war, two years of which were in submarine infested waters."

* * * * *

 

KNIGHT, Phillip, Chief Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - CN Steamship 'Delwarnic' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Cobourg, Ontario.

"Operational award: For brave conduct in the face of the enemy, three years sea service in enemy submarine infested waters. Mr. Knight has shown continuous devotion to duty during all this period and exemplary conduct while, Second Engineer on the Bic Island trading Canada to the united Kingdom from 26th April 1941 to 31st July 1942."

* * * * *

KNOX, Robert Davidson, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Imperial Oil - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944.

"Operated from Halifax, Nova Scotia, to Newfoundland and Labrador, to emergency war service. Long meritorious service."

* * * * *

KOHLER, Carl J.R., Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Park Steamship 'Dufferin Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945.

"Was present with his ship, not the Dufferin Park, in St. Nazaire Harbour, France, at the time of the evacuation by the British troops, in June, 1941, and by his expert seamanship, was able to bring his vessel, slow and unarmed, and loaded with plywood for planes, through the mine sown waters and a fleeing shipping, and under bomber attacks by the Nazis, in safety to Falmouth, England. Made many subsequent trips to West Indies, and because of slow speed of his ship, without convoy. Long arduous and dangerous service."

* * * * *

KOROGI, Robert, Ordinary Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Elder Line 'Point Pleasant Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Toronto, Ontario. Details of S.S. Point Pleasant Park being torpedoed by U-510 in the South Atlantic, NW of Cape Town, South Africa on 23 February 1945 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 241.

"Badly injured in torpedoing of S.S. Point Pleasant Park. Suffered extremely, with unusual patience, through wet and cold weather in open boat for nine days."

* * * * *

LACHANCE, Napoleon, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Montreal Pilotage District - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Isle of Orleans, Quebec. Served with Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for Montreal Pilotage District.

"Long and efficient service, over 36 years, excellent record. Highly recommended."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has recommendation dated 2 April 1946.

With regard to the Montreal District, the oldest and most active pilot is Napoleon Lachance, who was born on December 28, 1883 and was licensed as a pilot on June 4, 1909. He has an excellent record and has been special pilot for the Canadian Pacific Steamships for over twenty years.

* * * * *

LACROIX, Joseph Willie, Boatswain - British Empire Medal (BEM) - 'N.B. McLean' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: St. Charles de Bellechasse, Quebec.

"Service 10 years, efficient and steady. His service during the war years has been consistently in keeping with the traditions of British marine records and in every way deserving of recognition."

* * * * *

LAROSE, Amedee, Oiler - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Canadian Marine Service - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946.

* * * * *

LAVALLEE, Alphonse Ernest, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Halifax Lighthouses No. 15, Government Steamship - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944.

"Applied for and granted leave of absence to join Navy in present war - not called. Present duties - arduous in an unprotected war area, about 10 miles off coast, exposed to Atlantic storms and enemy action."

* * * * *

LeBLANC, Anaclet, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Cathcart' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: St. Michele de Bellechasse, Quebec.

"Non-operational award: For long, continued, faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea and in port during this war. In command of S.S. Cathcart between Canadian and / or United States Atlantic Coast Ports and British West Indies throughout the whole of the present war period, during which time he has rendered exemplary service."

* * * * *

LeBLANC, Edward Alfred, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Lady Rodney' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: Montreal, Quebec. Master of the S.S. Lady Rodney from outbreak of war to Autumn of 1942. Master of the S.S. Victoria Park and then S.S. Rockwood Park.

"Non-operational award: For long, continued, faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea and in port during this war. Was Master of Lady Rodney at the outbreak of war up until the Autumn of 1942, and subsequently appointed as Master of the Victoria park and later the Rockwood Park, which latter vessel he still commands. All vessels have been in zones where the enemy has been known to be active. When in Command of Lady Rodney, Captain LeBlanc carried troops on several occasions between Canada and Bermuda and the British West Indies, and later, during the summer of 1942, after the Lady Rodney had been converted to a Canadian Army Transport, made a umber of special voyages with large bodies of troops, both ways, between Quebec and Goose Bay, Labrador, during the time enemy submarines were very active and many ships were torpedoed in the St. Lawrence and adjacent waters. He was frequently appointed Commodore of Convoy."

* * * * *

LEICESTER, Richard Avery, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Master / Princess 'Marguarite' - Awarded as per London Gazette of 9 November 1943 (no Canada Gazette). Master of the Princess Marguarite.

"The ship was torpedoed and had to be abandoned. The Master displayed great courage and presence of mind throughout and it was due to his excellent leadership and organization that the loss of life of the personnel on board was minimised."

MBE (Civil) were awarded for the sinking to:

Third Engineer Officer Edward Evander STEWART, Esq.

Sixth Engineer Officer William Borthwick HARRIS, Esq.

They probably were not Canadian. NOTE: file 18-2-7 says that Harris was born in Victoria, 8 November 1912 and was residing in Victoria; Stewart was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 15 May 1901 and was residing in British Columbia.

"The Third and Sixth Engineer Officers were on duty in the engine room when the vessel was hit. They showed conspicuous courage, coolness and resource in remaining at their posts and stopping the main engines. But for this action, the loss of life would undoubtedly have been very heavy."

* * * * *

LEGENDRE, Paul Rene, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Hamildoc' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943. (?) Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"For continuous good service while operating in dangerous waters and remaining in that service as Master until the loss of his ship by enemy action on 1 January 1943."

* * * * *

LINAKER, Robert, Captain, DSC - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - CN Steamship 'Fort Kootenay' - Awarded as per London Gazette of 1 April 1945 (no Canada Gazette). Master of the S.S. Fort Kootenay. Awarded DSC in WW1.

* * * * *

LINTON, James, Cadet - British Empire Medal (BEM) - S.S. 'Shariston' - Awarded as per London Gazette of 6 January 1942 (no Canada Gazette).

* * * * *

MACDONALD, John Paul, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship Lady Nelson - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

For outstanding service and devotion to duty as Chief Engineer when his ship was torpedoed and subsequently salvaged and towed to port.

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations", in National Archives of Canada, Record Group 12, Volume 1106, has recommendation passed from the General Manager, Canadian National Steamships to Deputy Minister of Transport, Ottawa, 27 October 1943. This confirms as being Chief Engineer aboard the Lady Nelson. The form gives his date of birth (18 June 1903, Inverness, Scotland) and states that he entered company service on 23 May 1937. It reads as follows:

Recommended For: Operational award: for brave conduct in the face of the enemy.

Place of Attack: While tied up alongside wharf at the inner berth in harbour of Castries, St. Lucia, British West Indies.

Date of Attack: 10.10 p.m., March 9th, 1942.

Nature of Attack: Struck by one torpedo fired by enemy submarine.

Damage Sustained: Bottom plating from stern to middle No.4 Hold about 60 feet in length, extending from keel to deck, entailing port propeller and shaft, completely gone. Rudder blown out of pintle. Bulkheads obviously sprung as water taken natural level in all Holds, except No.1, which has a depth of eight feet. Engine and Boiler rooms flooded to coamings. Settled by stern to midship on mud upright, the poop being just above water.

Details: Stood by ship after torpedoing in spite of imminent danger of further attack. H.P. turbines were awash at approximately 10.49 p.m. but emergency generator kept running. Lights from main generators died down at approximately 10.50 p.m. and emergency lights were put on. Watertight doors were released at approximately 10.51 p.m. but engine and boiler rooms were then flooded. Emergency generator shut off at 11.15 p.m. to shut off emergency generator, for the reason submarine, if still in the vicinity, could pick up noises on her detectors.

Remained with the ship at St.Lucia from the time of torpedoing (March 9th) until the latter part of April, when recalled to Canada by Company to take over Chief Engineer's duties in the Lady Rodney. While en route to Canada from St.Lucia as a passenger in the Lady Drake, ship was torpedoed and lost north of Bermuda.

During the time Mr. MacDonald was in St.Lucia, performed outstanding work in connection with the salvaging of the vessel, and helped the Salvage Company in salvage operations, refloating the ship and keeping the water down. He was successful in putting engines and auxiliaries into as good a condition as it was possible to have them under the circumstances, and had steam up on one boiler. This was of great help, as otherwise the ship would have been a "dead" tow on the [blank] day [blank] run from St.Lucia to Mobile, Alabama (repair depot) via Jamaica, through submarine infested waters.

* * * * *

MACKENZIE, Frank Milton, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Sydney Pilotage District - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: North Sydney, Nova Scotia. Served with Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for Sydney Pilotage District.

"Boarded S.S. J. Penchney Henderson which was burning near entrance to Sydney Harbour, Nova Scotia, on August 31, 1943. After searching vessel, in spite of flames, to discover any injured crew, and finding only some 34 charred bodies, Pilot MacKenzie assisted the crew of Tug Gripper in towing the vessel to a place of safety. The ship was beached in the North West Arm, Sydney Harbour, at 1:20 p.m. the same day."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 2, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a letter from Captain E.S. Brand (Director of Naval Intelligence and Trade) to Mr. R. Dorman (Secretary, Sub-Committee on Awards to Merchant Seaman, Department of Transport, Ottawa) dated 4 September 1945 respecting actions during burning of American merchant ship SS J. Pinckney Henderson.

Pilot F.M. MacKenzie boarded the hulk at about 0900 August 31st, 1943, from the usual pilot station. This pilot had no forewarning of the conditions aboard ship before going on board. Despite the adverse conditions of noxious, toxic fumes from the holds and charred human remains lying around the decks, he proceeded to pilot the ship, being towed by H.M.R.T. Griper. He brought the ship into Sydney Harbour and tied up to the compass buoy at about 1200. During these three hours pilot MacKenzie was on board, he gave assistance willingly. He carried out his unpleasant task cheerfully and efficiently.

At about 1810 of the same say, explosions took place in Number 2 hold and it was decided to beach the ship in the ballast grounds at the North West Arm. Pilot St.C. Allan boarded the Helena and proceeded with her towards the ballast grounds. While the tow was in progress, violent explosions occurred frequently on the hulk, showing debris into the sea. At that time it could not be seen as to how violent these explosions might become, and all aboard the tug were in personal danger. The ship was beached at 2045 and the pilot remained aboard the tug until the hulk was finally abandoned,

* * * * *

McARTHUR, Archibald, Chief Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship Colborne - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Born 6 June 1887 in Glasgow, Scotland. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"Operational award: For brave conduct in the face of the enemy. 8:45 a.m. December 16th, 1940, during moderate gale, heavy sea - date and time of attack - about four days out from Liverpool while enroute to Halifax, position approximately 350 miles off the coast of Ireland. Thirty minute attack by one bomber (German aircraft) who dropped four bombs around the ship and machine gunned the decks. Three of the four bombs were effective although none actually hit the ship, but one, a near miss, exploded very close to the starboard quarter, the concussion resulting in heavy damage and numerous breakages interior including some castings. Damage to main steam piping and auxiliaries and structure of the ship. Tunnel shaft strained required realignment. Galley demolished. repairs took about one month to complete in and out of drydock.

At 8:45 a.m. December 16th, 1940, the German bomber appeared and commenced its attack. The ship's gun was manned and brought into action and zig-zagging resorted to in order to foil the attack. The boats were lowered and most of the crew put into them. Seven remained aboard including the Captain, Third Officer, two A.B.'s, Chief Engineer, Second Engineer, and Fourth Engineer. After the plane left, holds were inspected but the ship was not making water. Lifeboats were recalled after being afloat about four hours, but due to bad weather, it was a hazardous and dangerous task to get the men back aboard. The port was badly damaged and the starboard one filled up and had to be cut adrift after two men nearly lost their lives in their efforts to haul it back aboard. If there had been another attack, the ship's company were in bad straits having then only one damaged lifeboat aboard. Ship reached Greenock, December 18th, after on of H.M. Ships went to her assistance.

Mr. McArthur served continuously as Chief Officer aboard this vessel from August 31st, 1940 to May 13th, 1942, during which time the ship was in the North Atlantic service, making crossings between Canada and United Kingdom.

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations", in National Archives of Canada, Record Group 12, Volume 1106, has recommendation passed from the General Manager, Canadian National Steamships to Deputy Minister of Transport, Ottawa, 28 October 1943. This identifies the ship as being the SS Bic Island (could the Colborne be his ship as of 1945 ?). The form gives his date of birth and states that he entered company service on 23 May 1923. However, it concentrates on another incident and reads as follows:

Recommended For: Operational award; for brave conduct in the face of the enemy.

Place of Attack: In convoy (St. George's Channel) while en route from Swansea to Quebec via Milford Haven.

Date of Attack: From 12.45 a.m. to 3.00 a.m. June 11th, 1941.

Nature of Attack: Enemy aircraft. Several bombs dropped in vicinity of vessel, many of them near misses. Bridge and decks raked by heavy machine gun fire.

Damage Sustained: Severe concussion felt during bombing. Bulkhead Captain's bathroom dented, windows damaged and perforated. Number of joints in engine room piping leaking. Rivets leaking. Frames fractured. Ship was subsequently drydocked for repairs.

Details: Stuck to his post throughout the attack.

(Mr. McArthur served continuously as Chief Engineer aboard this vessel from August 31st, 1940 to May 13th, 1942, during which time the ship was in the North Atlantic service, making crossings between Canada and the United Kingdom)

* * * * *

McLEOD, Duncan, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Montreal - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of ?

"Valuable service under trying conditions in the Canadian Merchant Navy. For devotion to duty and exceptional skill in navigating his vessel after being damaged by a torpedo. Emergency repairs were made and he was able to bring his ship to port for repairs.

* * * * *

MEARNS, Thomas Hutchinson, Second Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship Chomody - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945.

Operational award: Brave conduct in the face of the enemy, several years service in submarine infested waters. Mr. Mearns has at all times been a power of moral strength in the Engine Room and while on the Canatco gave exemplary work both before and after the steamer foundered in Hamilton Inlet. Mr. Mearns carries no Marine Engineer's Certificate but has been acting on permits during the whole of the wartime period and at one time brought the steamer Chomody home from the West Indies as Acting Chief Engineer. He has given outstanding devotion to duty and continued good service afloat since the commencement of the war.

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations", in National Archives of Canada, Record Group 12, Volume 1106, has recommendation passed from the General Manager, Canadian National Steamships to Deputy Minister of Transport, Ottawa, 28 October 1943. This identifies the ship as being the SS Bic Island (could the Chomedy be his ship as of 1945 ?). The form gives his date of birth (27 October 1901, South Shields, England) and states that he entered company service on 26 October 1929. It reads as follows:

Recommended For: Operational award; for brave conduct in the face of the enemy.

Place of Attack: In convoy (St. George's Channel) while en route from Swansea to Quebec via Milford Haven.

Date of Attack: From 12.45 a.m. to 3.00 a.m. June 11th, 1941.

Nature of Attack: Enemy aircraft. Several bombs dropped in vicinity of vessel, many of them near misses. Bridge and decks raked by heavy machine gun fire.

Damage Sustained: Severe concussion felt during bombing. Bulkhead Captain's bathroom dented, windows damaged and perforated. Number of joints in engine room piping leaking. Rivets leaking. Frames fractured. Ship was subsequently drydocked for repairs.

Details: For devotion to duty throughout the attack.

(Mr. Mearns was appointed as Fourth Engineer to the Bic Island on October 2nd, 1940, and promoted as Third on February 27th, 1941, subsequently being made Second.

He was aboard the ship from October 2nd, 1940 to July 7th, 1942, during which time the ship was in the North Atlantic Service, making crossings between Canada and the United Kingdom).

* * * * *

MOYLE, Michael Joseph, Second Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Lady Nelson' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"Stayed with ship when torpedoed."

NOTE: Volume 2 of Department of Transport file 18-2-7, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada RG.12, Volume 1106) has the following details. He was born on 13 October 1913 at Morrisburg, Ontario and entered the service of Canadian National Steamships on 4 October 1933. He was the Second Engineer of the Lady Nelson at the time of the incidents described below under the following headings:

Recommended For: Operational award; for brave conduct in the face of the enemy.

Place of Attack: While tied up alongside wharf at the inner berth in harbour of Castries, St.Lucia, B.W.I.

Date of Attack: 10.10 p.m., March 9th, 1942.

Nature of Attack: Struck by one torpedo fired by enemy submarine.

Damage Sustained: Bottom plating from stern to middle No.4 Hold about 60 feet in length, extending from keel to deck, entailing port propeller and shaft, completely gone. Rudder blown out of pintle. Bulkheads obviously sprung as water taken natural level in all Holds, except No.1, which has a depth of eight feet. Engine and Boiler rooms flooded to coamings. Settled by stern to midship on mud upright, the poop being just above water.

Details: Stood by ship with Chief Engineer after torpedoing in spite of imminent danger of further attack. H.P. turbines were awash at approximately 10.49 p.m. but emergency generator was kept running. Lights from main generators died at approximately 10.50 p.m. and emergency lights were put on. Watertight doors were released at approximately 10.51 p.m. but engine and boiler rooms were then flooded. Emergency generator shut off at 11.15 p.m. for the reason submarine, if still in the vicinity, could pick up noise on her dectors [sic].

Remaining with the ship at St.Lucia from the time of torpedoing (March 9th) until she reached Mobile, Alabama, the repair port. During the time Mr. Moyle was in St.Lucia, assisted the Chief Engineer in performing outstanding work in connection with the salvaging of the vessel, and helped the Salvage Company in salvage operations, refloating the ship and keeping the water down. Contributed to putting the engines and auxiliaries into as good a condition as it was possible to have them under the circumstances, and finally steam was on one boiler. This was a great help, as otherwise the ship would have been a "dead" tow on the [blank] day [blank] run to Mobile, Alabama (repair port) via Jamaica, through enemy submarine infested waters. Was appointed as Chief Engineer on the voyage to Mobile, rendering great service under difficult conditions in the hazardous task of towing a disabled ship.

* * * * *

MURRAY, John James, Carpenter - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Canadian National Steamship 'Cornwallis' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: Glasgow, Nova Scotia.

"Stayed with ship when torpedoed in West Indian waters."

Details of the Cornwallis being torpedoed by U-514 off Barbados, on 11 September 1942 (and surviving) can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 240.

* * * * *

NEILSON, William, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Princess Kathleen' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943. (?) Home: Victoria, British Columbia.

"For devotion to duty while Chief Engineer of Princess Kathleen which has continuously operated in dangerous waters for over two years."

* * * * *

NEWELL, Foreman, Fisherman - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Rescue crew of SS Gertrud Rask - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia. See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Rodman Brannen (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Sydney Christie (BEM), Fred Crowell (King's Commendation), Julius Purdy (King's Commendation) and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by the Naval Officer in Charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"Formed the crews of three small boats, which on the night of February 7th, 1942, went to the rescue of the crew of the Danish Government S.S. Gertrud Rask stranded on Banton Rocks during a violent storm. The Naval Officer from Shelburn, who came down to Baccaro to direct the rescue, speaks in glowing terms of the courage and seamanship displayed by this man and of the terrific personal physical risk taken by him in the matter."

* * * * *

O'HARA, Morris, Chief Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Montreal - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of ?

"For valuable work under trying conditions in the Merchant Navy."

* * * * *

OLIVER, Walter, Chief Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Gatineau Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: New Westminster, British Columbia.

"War emergency service in Far East, during which time his ship was sunk by enemy action. Devotion to duty. Long meritorious service."

* * * * *

OWEN, H.J., Chief Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943. Home: Vancouver, British Columbia.

"Valuable work under trying conditions in the Merchant Navy. For long and honourable service in the Canadian Merchant Navy, including continual and hazardous service under wartime conditions."

* * * * *

PARKER, John P., Chief Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born in Sydney, Nova Scotia, 26 September 1907. Home: Sydney, Nova Scotia.

"This Chief Officer has served continuously at sea in dangerous waters on Canadian Merchant vessels, including tankers, since the outbreak of war and has been highly commended for meritorious service and for devotion to duty."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has recommendation dated 22 October 1945.

Continuously employed at sea since September 23, 1940, trading in submarine infested and dangerous waters as Third, Second and Chief Officer. Promoted to Chief Officer June 1, 1941.

* * * * *

PARKS, Atwood, Fishing Skipper - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Rescue of Swordfish NE975 crew - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: East Lahave, Nova Scotia.

"On 15 May 1944, Skipper Parks rescued the three crewmen of Airplane Swordfish NE 975 which made a forced landing in the Atlantic near Sable Island. The fishing schooner was some 7 or 8 miles away from the airplane when the accident occurred and did not see what was happening. A companion plane, Swordfish NF 155 was in the vicinity, however, and attracted the attention of Mr. Parks and his men by diving over the spot, firing Verey Lights and dropped smoke floats. No Morse Code was used as the fishing crew were not acquainted with Morse Code signals, but with intelligent appreciation of the efforts of the NF 155 to attract notice, Mr. Parks dropped his work at the nets and set out at top speed for the location indicated. A boat was dropped and the airmen taken on board the schooner, where they were clothed in warm clothing and given hot coffee and efficient first aid treatment. Much later, the rescued men transferred to the HMCS Sherbrooke."

The officer in charge of the wrecked plane gives the following estimate of Mr. Park's services:

"There can be no doubt that Mr. Parks and his crew were definitely and directly responsible, by their efficiency and resourcefulness, for saving the lives of my crew and myself. We certainly could not have held on to the aircraft dinghy until the HMCS Sherbrooke arrived. No praise is too high for their speed in appreciating the situation and coming to our help, nor for their cheerfulness and whole-hearted care and attention which we received on Board."

* * * * *

PIERCE, L., Carpenter - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Canadian National Steamship 'Colborne' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: Port Maitland, Nova Scotia.

"Saving vessel when bombed by waves of Japanese aircraft."

The S.S. Colborne (Canadian National Steamships was attacked by Japanese aircraft, on 11 December 1944, at anchor in Penang. She was holed 50 times but got away with a valuable rubber cargo."

* * * * *

POOLE, Keith Carson, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship Grafton Park - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born 25 June 1898 in Swanscombe, Kent.

"Served continuously in Park Steamers in war zones since 22nd June, 1943, having previously had continuously served in Canadian Pacific Steamers Empress of Britain and Empress Magpie from September 1939 to October 1942."

* * * * *

POOLE, William Albert, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - DOT Marine Section 'Saurel' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Burrett Isle, Newfoundland.

"Has handled Department of Transport ships on Nova Scotia coast all through the war. Has saved lives and property through skill and knowledge in rescue work. Navigated his ship through 500 miles of ice and rescued men from a plane."

* * * * *

POWER, Nicholas L., Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Halifax Pilotage District - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia. Served with Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for Halifax Pilotage District.

"Long and faithful efficient service, duties rendered especially arduous and dangerous during the six years of war (30 years of service). The Halifax Pilots, because of their position off the Port of Halifax, Nova Scotia, were continuously subjected to great risk during the war, the pilot boat's position being, of course, some miles outside the Examination Vessel of the Royal Canadian Navy, and it is doubtful if there was any other port on the North Atlantic where great convoys moved in and out day and night under all kinds of weather conditions. The Pilots operated right alongside the dangerous mine fields, ships were sunk by submarine action right alongside the pilot boat as the pilots were carrying out their duties as pilots to other ships; and the Pilot Boat Camperdown was severely shaken by depth charges during war action. Furthermore, pilots were over-carried from the port of Halifax to the New England States and the West Indies by ships when there was such high loss through enemy action in these special waters. It is quite logical reasoning to conclude if the crews of the ships which carried the pilots were subject to risk, so were the pilots. Pilots were also carried several hundred miles out to sea where they were taken off by warships of the Royal Canadian Navy. Again, it is logical to assume if such naval ships were liable to be organized or engaged in war action, it is not necessary to theorize on this point in consideration of the risk, the pilots who were aboard were subject to exactly the same condition. In addition, it is also pointed out that the pilot boat has, during the war, gone as far as 5 miles outside her station in dense fog and thick snow, etc., to board ships to obviate the risk of their being torpedoed."

* * * * *

PROCTOR, Edgar G., Able Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Elder Line 'Point Pleasant Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Toronto, Ontario. Details of S.S. Point Pleasant Park being torpedoed by U-510 in the South Atlantic, NW of Cape Town, South Africa on 23 February 1945 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 241.

"When the S.S. Point Pleasant Park (Elder Dempster Lines Ltd) was on passage from Canada to South Africa in 1945, she was torpedoed and the stern part of the vessel collapsed. Water rushed into the hold, the propeller was blown off and, although the pumps were started, the water continued to rise. Eventually the ship had to be abandoned. The Master instructed all boats to keep together and gave the course which should be followed. Nine days later the men were picked up by one of H.M. Ships. Able Seaman Proctor showed exceptional courage and ability throughout.

This Able Seaman entered a flooded compartment on the S.S. Point Pleasant Park and rescued two badly injured seamen."

* * * * *

PURDY, Julius, Fisherman - King's Commendation for Brave Conduct - Rescue crew of SS Gertrud Rask - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia. See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Rodman Brannen (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Sydney Christie (BEM), Fred Crowell (King's Commendation), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), and Douglas Smith (BEM). Recommended by the Naval Officer in Charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"Formed the crews of three small boats, which on the night of February 7th, 1942, went to the rescue of the crew of the Danish Government S.S. Gertrud Rask stranded on Banton Rocks during a violent storm. The Naval Officer from Shelburn, who came down to Baccaro to direct the rescue, speaks in glowing terms of the courage and seamanship displayed by this man and of the terrific personal physical risk taken by him in the matter."

* * * * *

RENNER, Edward Vincent, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Halifax Pilotage District - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia. Served with Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for Halifax Pilotage District.

"Long and faithful efficient service, duties rendered especially arduous and dangerous during the six years of war (36 years of service). The Halifax Pilots, because of their position off the Port of Halifax, Nova Scotia, were continuously subjected to great risk during the war, the pilot boat's position being, of course, some miles outside the Examination Vessel of the Royal Canadian Navy, and it is doubtful if there was any other port on the North Atlantic where great convoys moved in and out day and night under all kinds of weather conditions. The Pilots operated right alongside the dangerous mine fields, ships were sunk by submarine action right alongside the pilot boat as the pilots were carrying out their duties as pilots to other ships; and the Pilot Boat Camperdown was severely shaken by depth charges during war action. Furthermore, pilots were over-carried from the port of Halifax to the New England States and the West Indies by ships when there was such high loss through enemy action in these special waters. It is quite logical reasoning to conclude if the crews of the ships which carried the pilots were subject to risk, so were the pilots. Pilots were also carried several hundred miles out to sea where they were taken off by warships of the Royal Canadian Navy. Again, it is logical to assume if such naval ships were liable to be organized or engaged in war action, it is not necessary to theorize on this point in consideration of the risk, the pilots who were aboard were subject to exactly the same condition. In addition, it is also pointed out that the pilot boat has, during the war, gone as far as 5 miles outside her station in dense fog and thick snow, etc., to board ships to obviate the risk of their being torpedoed."

* * * * *

RICHARDSON, Percy, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Fishing Schooner 'Lucille M.' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Home: Shelburne, Nova Scotia. Details of the Lucille M. being sunk by gunfire from U-89 on George's Bank, south of Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia, on 25 July 1942 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Table 7, page 252.

"For outstanding service when his fishing schooner, the Lucille M. was sunk by an enemy submarine. This seaman collected his crew in the dories, gave first aid to the wounded, and then gave an example of courage and leadership which enabled them to proceed 97 miles to land."

* * * * *

ROACH, Neil John, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Lady Rodney' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Margaretsville, Nova Scotia.

"Master of the G.A.T. Lady Rodney which steamer has been steadily engaged since 1942 carrying troops between Canada and various war centres."

* * * * *

ROSENDAAL, Frank, Fourth Engineer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Elder Line 'Pointe Pleasant Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Transcona, Manitoba. Details of S.S. Point Pleasant Park being torpedoed by U-510 in the South Atlantic, NW of Cape Town, South Africa on 23 February 1945 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 241.

"When the S.S. Point Pleasant Park (Elder Dempster Lines Ltd) was on passage from Canada to South Africa in 1945, she was torpedoed and the stern part of the vessel collapsed. Water rushed into the hold, the propeller was blown off and, although the pumps were started, the water continued to rise. Eventually the ship had to be abandoned. The Master instructed all boats to keep together and gave the course which should be followed. Nine days later the men were picked up by one of H.M. Ships.

Fourth Engineer Rosendaal directed the rescue of two badly wounded seamen from a flooded compartment in the S.S. Point Pleasant Park which was torpedoed and lost."

* * * * *

SABEAN, Alexander George, Lightship Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Lightship #6 off Halifax - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"For long and arduous service in charge of Lightship No. 5, off Halifax, Nova Scotia, during the war period. This service has been subject to dangers of submarine attacks."

* * * * *

SANTERRE, August, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Quebec Pilotage District - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: St. Michel de Bellechasse, Quebec. Served with the Deputy Minister of Transport Pilotage Authority for Quebec Pilotage District.

"Long and efficient service over forty years. Piloted the Empress of Australia when the King and Queen visited Canada in 1939. Highly recommended."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has recommendation dated 2 April 1946.

Pilot Auguste Santerre is the senior pilot in the Quebec District. He was born on January 23, 1882 and was licensed as a pilot on January 20, 1904. He piloted the Royal Yacht Empress of Australia when Their Majesties visited Canada in 1939. Pilot Santerre has been a special pilot for the Canadian Pacific Steamships on the lower river for over 25 years. His record is excellent and I testify to his character and competency.

* * * * *

SCOTT, Isaac, Fireman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Canadian National Steamships - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born at Moramt Bay, Jamaica, 1892. Home: Dunfress, Jamaica, B.W.I.

"This seaman has served as Fireman on Canadian Merchant vessels for a great many years, including the entire war period, when the ships upon which he was serving were traversing submarine infested and dangerous waters. Mr. Scott is highly recommended by the Chief Engineers of his vessels for having consistently given faithful and trustworthy service."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 3, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has recommendation dated 22 October 1945, at which time he was fireman on Lady Rodney.

Mr. Scott served with the company for ten years before the war period and was a fireman on the Lady Rodney for the entire war period, serving in submarine infested and dangerous waters. He has been very highly recommended by the Chief Engineer of the Lady Rodney as having done his duty in a faithful manner and a good trustworthy servant of the company during the long service before the war and also during the entire war period.

* * * * *

SCOTT, Pierre Lebray, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Victoria Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"Non-operational award: For long, continued, faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea and in port during the war, two years of which were in submarine infested waters."

* * * * *

SLADE, John, Able Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Elder Line 'Point Pleasant Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Details of S.S. Point Pleasant Park being torpedoed by U-510 in the South Atlantic, NW of Cape Town, South Africa on 23 February 1945 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 241.

"When the S.S. Point Pleasant Park (Elder Dempster Lines Ltd) was on passage from Canada to South Africa in 1945, she was torpedoed and the stern part of the vessel collapsed. Water rushed into the hold, the propeller was blown off and, although the pumps were started, the water continued to rise. Eventually the ship had to be abandoned. The Master instructed all boats to keep together and gave the course which should be followed. Nine days later the men were picked up by one of H.M. Ships. Able Seaman Proctor showed exceptional courage and ability throughout.

This Able Seaman entered a flooded compartment on the S.S. Point Pleasant Park and rescued two badly injured seamen."

* * * * *

SLOCOMBE, Frederick Steed, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Department of Transport - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943. Home: Ottawa, Ontario.

"For valuable service under trying conditions in the Merchant Navy."

* * * * *

SMITH, Alexander Curtis, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Imperial Oil 'Wildwood Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"Non-operational Award: For meritorious, long, and faithful service during the whole period of war operating in dangerous waters with highly explosive cargoes."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 2, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a letter from H.J. Rahlves (Marine Department, Imperial Oil) to Mr. Arthur Randles, Director of Merchant Seamen, Department of Transport, dated 11 September 1944, which states:

Alexander Curtis Smith - has been Chief Engineer on Imperial Oil Limited Vessels and those of the Park Steamship Company Limited for the full war period. Up to December 1942, with the exception of a short period on Panama Transport Company vessels which were operated by us in the overseas service, he was Chief Engineer of the SS Sarnolite and SS Iocolite engaged in the Halifax/Newfoundland/Labrador service, and was then transferred to the SS Point Peelee Park as Chief Engineer on that unit. He later went to Vancouver where he looked after the completion of the various 'Park' vessels assigned to Imperial Oil Limited for management, and made the first voyage in each of these vessels in order to train personnel. Mr. Smith is now Chief Engineer of the SS Wildewood Park operating in the Western Atlantic. He has been an employee of this company since March 1928.

* * * * *

SMITH, Donald, Chief Officer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship 'Empress of Asia' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943. He escaped to Australia after the sinking of the Empress of Asia. He then served as Chief Officer of the Empress of Scotland.

"For exceptional devotion to duty and bravery in helping organize the defence of his ship when under constant attack by dive-bombers, organizing fire-fighting parties, and helping to superintend abandonment of ship. He was one of the last to leave. Later, he took command of a small coastal steamer carrying some of the vessel's crew in an endeavour to reach safety. This small vessel was under constant air attack and both food and water were exhausted. They had to abandon this ship when attacked by enemy naval units and parachute troops. Mr. Smith successfully led his party of 41 overland to safety."

Details of the Empress of Asia being bombed by Japanese aircraft, off Singapore on 5 February 1942 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 231.

* * * * *

SMITH, Douglas, Fishing Skipper - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Rescue of the crew 'Gertrud Rask' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 16 June 1945 and London Gazette of 14 June 1945. Home: Baccaro, Nova Scotia. See also: Danny Bower (King's Commendation), Rodman Brannen (King's Commendation), Cecil Chetwynd (King's Commendation), Fred Chetwynd (BEM), Earl Christie (King's Commendation), Sydney Christie (BEM), Fred Crowell (King's Commendation), Foreman Newell (King's Commendation), and Julius Purdy (King's Commendation). Recommended by the Naval Officer in Charge at Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

"Skippered a small boat which, in conjunction with two others, attempted the rescue of the crew of the Danish Government S.S. Gertrud Rask stranded on Banton Rocks, Nova Scotia, on the night of February 7, 1942, during a violent storm. While Skipper Smith's boat did not succeed in reaching the wreck, the Naval Officer from Shelburne, who accompanied Skipper Smith's crew, speaks most enthusiastically and admiringly of the superb seamanship displayed by Smith and his men and of the tremendous personal physical risk involved in the attempt to aid the rescue."

* * * * *

SMITH, John Bisset, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship 'Empress of Asia' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943. Details of the Empress of Asia being bombed by Japanese aircraft, off Singapore on 5 February 1942 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 231.

"Outstanding public service in connection with the Merchant Marine. For exceptional devotion to duty when his ship was attacked by formations of enemy dive-bombers and set afire. Although his hands were badly burned and skinned, Captain Smith superintended the abandonment of the ship and was the last to leave. The following days he unsuccessfully attempted to reboard the burning vessel. Later, he was successful in navigating a small coastal steamer from Singapore to Batavia under exceptional conditions."

* * * * *

STONE, Francis Thomas, Boatswain - British Empire Medal (BEM) - DOT Marine Section 'Laurentian' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: St. John, New Brunswick.

"Service nine years, steady and efficient. his service during the war years has been consistently in keeping with the traditions of British Marine records and in every way deserving of recognition."

* * * * *

SUTHERLAND, James Wilson, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Park Steamship Company - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: St. Catherines, Ontario. Montreal-Australia-New Zealand Steamship Company.

"This officer has served in command of several 10,000 ton merchant vessels of the Park Steamship Co. operating in dangerous waters in the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Far East for a considerable period of time. Captain Sutherland has proved a most efficient Master and has exhibited exceptional devotion to duty. He is particularly commended for having relinquished an important shore appointment to perform service at sea during the war, as he did during the First Great War."

* * * * *

THOMAS, George Vincent, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Imperial Oil 'M.S. Trontolite' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944.

"Operated to Labrador in convoy attacked by enemy. War emergency service. Long meritorious service."

* * * * *

THOMAS, Herbert Lawson, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - War Emergency Tanker - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944. Home: Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia.

"His tanker operated in the Mediterranean area carrying bulk petroleum, and to and from important distribution centres in the Western Atlantic."

* * * * *

 

THOMAS, John Wallace, Captain - Commander - Order of the British Empire (CBE) - Empress of Japan - Awarded as per London Gazette of 8 June 1944 (no Canada Gazette).

Master of the Empress of Japan.

Captain John Wallace Thomas commanded the Canadian Pacific’s Empress of Scotland throughout WWII and won the

CBE for his skilful handling of that ship during a Luftwaffe attack off Ireland in 1940.

He was chosen as one of the six Valiants to represent all those who forged our nationhood in the course of the World Wars.

* * * * *

* * * * *

THOMSON, James Nimmo, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship Crystal Park - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born 19 January 1893 at Motherwell, Scotland. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"Mr. James Thomson has had continuous service at sea since commencement of hostilities. For the first twelve months, he was employed ass Second Engineer of S.S. Beaverford carrying munitions of war from Canada to England. He was transferred to Troop Transport Empress of Canada as Second Engineer, engaged in carrying troops and military stores in Australasian waters, Indian Ocean, North and South Atlantic. In March 1943, the Empress of Canada was torpedoed and Mr. Thomson, as senior engineer of the watch, was responsible for stopping the engines and taking all necessary steps in the engine room to prolong the life of the vessel, and afford all the time possible for the abandonment of troops, passengers and crews from the fast sinking vessel. Thereafter, Mr. Thomson served in the Troop Transport Empress of Scotland until 12th January 1944, when he was appointed Chief Engineer of the S.S. Mount Robson Park, serving in the Pacific waters until May, 1944, when he received his present appointment as Chief Engineer of S.S. Crystal park in general service in the North Atlantic ocean and Mediterranean. Mr. Thomson is 52 years old."

* * * * *

THOMSON, Lawrence, Pilot - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Vancouver Pilotage District - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 15 June 1946 and London Gazette of 13 June 1946. Home: Vancouver, British Columbia. Served with the Ministry of Transport as Pilotage Authority for Vancouver Pilotage District.

"Long and efficient service, especially during the war years. Highly esteemed by both his fellow pilots and shipping circles."

* * * * *

TREWEEK, Cecil Randolph, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Imperial Oil Company - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Toronto, Ontario.

"Non-operational award: For meritorious, long and faithful service during the whole period of war, operating in dangerous waters with highly explosive cargo."

NOTE: Department of Transport file 18-2-7, Volume 2, "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - Awards to Merchant Seamen - Recommendations" (National Archives of Canada, RG.12, Volume 1106) has a letter from H.J. Rahlves (Marine Department, Imperial Oil) to Mr. Arthur Randles, Director of Merchant Seamen, Department of Transport, dated 11 September 1944, which states:

Captain Cecil Randolph Treweek, R.D; R.N.R - has been Master if our own and vessels of Park Steamship Company Limited during the entire war period. All the vessels on which he served as Master were operating in the Western Atlantic, with the exception of a period at the beginning of hostilities when his vessel was in the overseas service. Although we do not know of any specific instances when he was in contact with enemy vessels, there is no doubt that there were times when he saw action, of which we have not been informed. Captain Treweek has been an employee of this Company since December 1919.

* * * * *

VALLIS, Allen Joseph, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - S.S. Farrandoc and S.S. Coteaudoc' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"For meritorious service in command of vessels engaged in dangerous area. Also for valiant conduct when Marine Superintendent in personally taking charge of the salvage of another of this Company's vessel which broke adrift from tow and was helpless for a considerable period until located whilst in submarine infested waters and then bringing the ship to safe harbour."

* * * * *

WALCH, George William, Captain - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian National Steamship Co. - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 June 1943 and London Gazette of 3 June 1943.

"For valuable service under trying conditions in the Merchant Navy."

* * * * *

WARDEN, William, Chief Officer - Member - Order of the British Empire (MBE) - Canadian Pacific Steamship 'Riverview Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Home: Vancouver, British Columbia.

"Long, dangerous service in North Atlantic waters since 1939. Previously to 1943 in United Kingdom Ships in convoy work under heavy submarine attacks."

* * * * *

WATSON, Alexander C., Boatswain - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Imperial Oil Company - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 10 June 1944 and London Gazette of 8 June 1944.

"Continuous service at sea during war. Ship sunk by enemy action."

* * * * *

WATTS, George William, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Lady Rodney' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945. Home: Halifax, Nova Scotia.

"Non-operational award: For long, continued, faithful and arduous duty whilst serving at sea during this war, two years of which were in submarine infested waters. Mr. Watts has given continuous devotion to duty and outstanding service during the whole of the war period, especially on C.A.T. Lady Rodney. Chief Engineer of the ship which has been steadily engaged since June 1942, in the transport of troops between Canada and Goose Bay, Labrador, as well as between Halifax and St. John's, Newfoundland, during which time there have been several close brushes with enemy submarines."

* * * * *

WEBBER, Douglas William, Chief Steward - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Gatineau Park and Grafton Park - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 5 January 1946 and London Gazette of 1 January 1946. Born 23 October 1889 in Manchester, England. Home: Vancouver, British Columbia.

"Served continuously in Park Steamships under Company management from July 23rd, 1942 to present date in Atlantic Convoys."

* * * * *

WILLIAMS, Joseph, Chief Engineer - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - Canadian National Steamship 'Wellandoc' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 8 January 1944 and London Gazette of 1 January 1944. Home: Montreal, Quebec.

"For continuous good service while serving as Chief Engineer on a vessel continuously employed in dangerous waters."

* * * * *

WILSON, Beverely Richard, Captain - Officer - Order of the British Empire (OBE) - British Merchant Marine - Awarded as per London Gazette of 4 February 1941 (no Canada Gazette). Serving with British Merchant Navy and later American Merchant Navy as a tanker captain. He was entering Pearl Harbour in an oil tanker when the Japanese air attack began.

"For rescue of British Army at Dunkirk."

* * * * *

WITHNELL, Joseph, Able Seaman - British Empire Medal (BEM) - Canadian National Steamship 'Whiteshell Park' - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 6 January 1945 and London Gazette of 1 January 1945.

"Joined Royal Hamilton Light Infantry (Active) March, 1940, was overseas from July 1940 until August 1943, at which time he was returned to Canada as a Prisoner of War Escort. He received his discharge from the Army November 12th, 1943. He joined this ship April 13th, 1944. it was not necessary for Withnell to join either the Army or the Merchant Navy as he has his own contracting business in Oakville. He served throughout the last war in the Royal Navy."

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MERCHANT MARINE Post WW2 Honour

CONNORTON, E.R., Chief Officer - Queen's Commendation for Brave Conduct - S.S. Empress of France - Awarded as per Canada Gazette of 11 April 1959.

"For bravery in assisting in the disarming of a mentally deranged passenger."

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MERCHANT SHIPS mentioned in CITATIONS

Details of the Empress of Asia being bombed by Japanese aircraft, off Singapore on 5 February 1942 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 231.

The S.S. Colborne (Canadian National Steamships was attacked by Japanese aircraft, on 11 December 1944, at anchor in Penang. She was holed 50 times but got away with a valuable rubber cargo."

 

Details of the S.S. Cornwallis being torpedoed by U-514 off Barbados, on 11 September 1942 (and surviving) can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 240. The Cornwallis was sunk on 3 December 1944 by U-1230 with the loss of all hands.

Details of the S.S. Lady Hawkins being torpedoed by U-66 in the open Atlantic, East of Cape Hatteras, on 19 January 1942 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 230.

Details of the Lucille M. being sunk by gunfire from U-89 on George's Bank, south of Cape Sable Island, Nova Scotia, on 25 July 1942 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Table 7, page 252.

 

Details of S.S. Point Pleasant Park being torpedoed by U-510 in the South Atlantic, NW of Cape Town, South Africa on 23 February 1945 can be found in "The Canadian Naval Chronicle 1939-1945" in Chapter 65, page 241.

 

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Files seen - 18-2-1 Volume 1 - "Honours, Decorations and Awards - British Empire - General" RG.12 Box 1105